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OF PROGRESS 



A Much Karuf.r Graduation Class at Howard 








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HOWARD 





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tke FUTURE 



Once again I Inward College is faced with war. 
We know what that means. But we know too 
that we tnusl not, and will not allow the princi- 
ples ni selfishness and domination to close our 
school. Because through one hundred years 
our College lias taught the ideals which will 
eventually defeat our aggressors. 
Many limes I nun main lips «-i' have heard that 
we are going in win. We have heard "we are 



going to win" so many times that we are tired 
of hearing it. "Speeches of victory" are be- 
coming old to us. Nevertheless, down inside we 
believe the ultimate victory to be cms because 
by faith we know that God is with our side. 
( >nr foes are prepared with everything but the 
spiritual sword of righteousness. It is with 
this weapon that we will win the battle. For 
the greater strength is not in physical pre- 
paradness but in spiritual preparation. 



ZL 19 4 2 



PRESENTS 



JONES NIACER 



lot 



GEORGE FINDLAY 

i5u,iine55 iViatiaaer 





RFCORD OF THE YEAR 




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aJ DEDICATED 



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Sometimes, when we arc our hotter selves, elevated by music or by the 
words of sonic heaven inspired man. we dream and plan of making a 
change to some better and more satisfied way of riving in which self 
will be forgotten and selfishness eliminated from our primary thoughts. 
We determine to waste no more time. For we arc convinced that we 
can never he happy and behind at the same time. 

However in a little while man}- such plans, many such dreams are re- 
membered no more and we become one of the harvest who are many 
and just admire the few who are the laborers. 

But some remember. As nearly as it is humanly possible their lives are 
moulded into the likeness of the only perfect man who ever lived. We 
are sure that these few are the only truly happy and successful men. 
Happy in the simple knowledge with the close of each day that they 
have done their best; though they may never he acclaimed and compli- 
mented by people and the world. 

It is because we believe Dr. Hess to he a good example of what we 
would like to he that we dedicated this the 1942 Kntre Nous to him. 
For sixteen years he has worked unceasingly and well at Howard. He 
fulfills our ideal of Mathematics teacher. 1 le is still working, reaching 
for goals which he will never grasp hut for which goals he will never 
cease to strive. We admire him for his intelligence, his industry. At the 
same time we love him for his friendliness and strength of character. 
We will never forget the example of Christian living that he has set for 
us to follow. 



DR. GEORGE W. HESS 











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We P A U S E 



Casually we signed four blank cards, and made 
ourselves forever part of the history of How- 
ard College. We walked into a classroom, and 
with that gesture joined the ranks beside those 
first nine boys. 

Opened in January 1842, at Marion. Alabama, 

Howard was named for the great English liber- 
ator. John Howard, and her first president was 
her only teacher. This president, Samuel Sterl- 
ing Sherman, saw his nine students joined by 
twenty-two other hoys in one year. In 1848 he 
graduated seven young men. 

The future of the young college seemed as- 
sured in IS.").'} when, under their second presi- 
dent, Henry Talhird. the endowment fund was 
$50,000. lint this was not to he. A fire leveled 
the college to the earth, and a war sent her 
president, her faculty, and her students march- 
ing away from their hooks. 

Two professors and one instructor reopened the 

doors of the sadly damaged Baptist school. The 
Endowment fund was gone. The people were 



impoverished, the crops failed, the students 
wire a mere handful. "But the gold that is re- 
fined in the hottest furnace comes out the 
purest," and the hoys who stuck it out during 
those dark days are among Howard's greatest: 
David Cordon Lyon. Harvard University's 
great authority on Semitic languages; John R. 
Sampey, president of the Southern Baptist 
Theological Seminary: John R. Tvsoii, chief 
justice of the State Supreme Court; Samuel 
W. Welsh, organizer for state health. John W. 
McCollum, missionary to Japan; and 1.. ( ). 
Dawson, revered pastor and Howard pro 
sor. 

Howard moved to Birmingham in L887. The 
first buildings were a dormitory called "The 
Barn," and another building called. "The Mess 
Hall." The present "Old Main" was new in 
L891. Renfroe Hall replaced "The Barn" in 
1902, and Montague Hall replaced "The Mess 
Hall" in L906. The campus had taken on much 
that is dear and familiar today. 




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THE PAST 



Those years were also notable for another inno- 
vation that made Howard College even more 
like it is today than mere buildings — the begin- 
ning of coeducation. Summer school became a 
part of the college tradition. 

The First World War was Howard's second 
encounter with national strife. Today we stand 
up and face another. 

In the years of the twenties, "'flaming youth" 
was the word, and enrollment soared. Fra- 
ternities built bouses, and the girls had really 
become a part of everything when, in FJ"20, 
Mamie Mell Smith Hall was built. 

Howard was put on the approved list of the 
Association of American Universities in lD'ifi. 
and on the approved list of the American As- 
sociation of University Women soon after- 
wards. 



The total number of graduates in the past 
twenty years is much larger than the total num- 
ber in the first eighty years. For the last ten 
years, Howard's total enrollment, which in- 
cludes summer school and extension students, 
has averaged more than fourteen hundred. 

Nine country boys came into Marion to col- 
lege, and one hundred years later two hundred 
boys signed up for national defense classes at 
Howard College in Birmingham. 

\\ hen you are a college, and you are exactly 
one hundred years old, then you have reached 
the very best of ages. Not too old to calmly 
ignore the passing of centuries, and not too 
young to lack dignity and tradition. Not too 
old to have forgotten the exuberance of being 
born, and quite old enough to be assured that 
the foundations are solid and endurine. 



From An ( )u> Print 




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MAJOR DAVIS 

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CL PRESIDENT 



Major Davis is a practical business man 
with a scholarly mind. Evidences of his ef- 
fective administration can lit- seen in the 
appearance of the Campus, in the personnel 
of the faculty, in the spirit of the .students. 

The old buildings of the College have come 

to look attractive. Living conditions in the 
dormitories have been improved. However 
the .Major is just making what we have 
look the best until the newer and greater 
Howard can be built, and with such a man 
as president we are confident that before 



many more years the Baptists will have 
equipment worthy of their denomination. 

Our president has tried to maintain a Chris- 
tian faculty, an intelligent faculty, and we 
feel that the faculty we have justifies his 
efforts. The majority of the teachers are 
men whose character and scholarship we will 
continue to admire. 

( )ur President is always willing to help us 

with whatever problems we may have. He 
shows a great interest in student affairs and 
we are glad that lie can take the time to as- 
sociate with us. 



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OOKING TOWARD MAIN FROM SECOND AvENUE 



The Library 




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DEAN BURNS 



A scholar and a conservative gentleman serves Howard as Dean of the College. 
For many years he has taught at Howard — longer than any other faculty member — 
and been associated with the college. During this time he has endeavored to main- 
tain the high ideals of scholarship which he represents. Himself a Howard alum- 
nus, he is the epitome of what the Howard graduate aspires to be — staunch in 
character, scholarly in temperament, combined with all the qualities which go to 
make up the conservative Christian gentleman. 

One of the things which stands out in the minds of the alumni is Dean Burns 
literature class ; for he disseminated to them from his own rich store a lasting ap- 
preciation of beauty. "A man to remember", you may be sure that Howard stu- 
dents will never forget him, nor will he forget even the least of these. 




DR. P. P. BURNS 




DEAN DALE 



For the length of time he has been 
here, no one is better liked than Dr. 
Dale. Dean of Men. His patience, in- 
telligence, wit, and good nature have 
endeared him to cur hearts. We can 
little help bul admire the diligence 
with which he pursues his labours. 

This year for the first time in many 
years, every male studenl was nut only 
asked but was almost compelled to 
have a personal conference with the 
Dean. This covered the student's major 
field and what he intended doing after 
graduation. The understanding and 
natural charms of Dean Dale made 
these interviews extremely helpful. We 
hope and expect this first year that 
Dean Dale has been with us to he one 
of many years during which lie will 
he working with Howard College. 




DEAN 
OBENCHAIN 



Mrs. Obenchain is certainly well fitted 
to he Howard's Dean of women. She 
has received training in Auburn, Troy, 
Peabody, and Columbia University. 
She has had experience in Alabama, 
Auburn, and Peabody. The manner in 
which she discharges her duties a- a 
teacher and as an advisor to the yirls 
reflects her experience and training. 

She will gladly help you in any way 
possible. Her office is always open to 
editors who wish to use it for making 
pictures and to students who wish to 
ask about social and personal problems. 
Her deep knowledge of sociology 
greatly adds to her effectiveness and 
usefulness as a Dean. Truly. Howard 
is fortunate in having her as Dean of 
Women. 



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Main ix the Spring 





First Row — Hul-Cee M. Acton. Mrs. George J. Bookman, Lewis T. Bostick, James Luthei 

Brakefield, Lent S. Brewster, Oscar S. Causey. 
Second Row — James H. Chapman, Vernon G. Davison, Myra T. Dunham, F.wen Gillis, James 

K. Greer, Louis C. Guenther. 
Third Row— Mrs. J. I). Hamrick, George W. Hess, Mrs. B. C. Holliday, William 1). Hull, 

L. A. Lovegren. 

VL FACULTY 



Hul-Cee M. Acton 
A.M., Ph.D. 
Professor of Romance Languages 

Mrs. George J. Bookman 

Hostess Renfroe Hall 

Lewis T. Bostick 

B.S. 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
|ames l.i' ni kk Brakefield 

A.M., I'h.n. 

Professor of Biology 

Lent S. Brewster 
A.B. 
Assistant to the President 

< (scab S. Causey 

././>'.. A.M. 

Professor of School Administration 
I a.mi'.s II. Chapman 

A.M., Th.M. 

Professor of Religious Education 

Vernon G. I )avison 
A.B., I'll. P. 
Instructor in Religion and Greek 

M YKA T. DUNH \ \l 

.-/./>'., M..I. 
Instructor in English 



Ewen Gillis 

B.S., I'h.C. M.S.. Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

I am i:s K. Greer 

A.M.. Ph.D. 
Professor of History 

I mis C. Guenther 
A.M. 
Registrar 

Mrs. J. I). II am RICK 
Hostess Smith Hall 

George W. i [ess 

AM., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Mrs. B. C. I loi.i.iD.w 
A.C.A. 
Instructor in Secretarial Studies 

William I ). I It 1.1. 
B.A., M..L. Ph. n. 
Instructor in English 

I.. \. Lovegren 

B.S., Ph. P. 

Associate Professor of Education 



VL FACULTY 



Mrs, Kathleen Martinson 
BS. in Musical Education 
Musical Instructor 

John B. Moore 
././.'.. M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Economics 

Mrs. I. I\. ( )BENCHAIN 
AM. 
Professor of Sociology 

Robert ( )wens 

A.M., Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Romance Languages 

foHN R. Patty 

B.S., Ph.D. 

Professor of Mathematics 

I I AM II. TON A. REID 

AM., Ph.D. 

Vice-President in Charge of Promotion 

Leon W. Richards 
rh.c B.S., M.A., I'h.n. 

Director of Pharmacy Department 
fOHN F. ROTHERMEL 
AM. 
Professor of Journalism 

Antoinette Sparks 
AM. 

Instructor in Dramatic Arts 



1 1 m Stuart 
B.S. 
Instructor in Physical Education 

Wallace M. True 
AM., I'h. IK 
Assistant Professor of History 

William C. White 
B.S.A, 
Director of Athletics 

1 1 vrold I-'.. Wilcox 
MS., i'h.n. 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Mabel Willoughby 

A.B., A.B. in Library Science 
Librarian 

Robert 1 1. Wilson 
M.A., i'h.n. 

Assistant Professor of English 

Mrs. John Xan 
A.B. in Dietetics 
Instructor in Dietetics 

John X a n 

ms., I'h.n. 

Professor "i Chemistry 



First Row— Mrs. Kathleen Martison, John B. Moore, Mrs. I. R. Obenchain, Robert Owens. 
John R. Patty, Hamilton A. Reid. 

Second Row— Leon W. Richards, John I-'. Rothermel, Antoinette Sparks. Jim Stuart, Wallace 
M. True William C. White. 

Third Row— Harold E. Wilcox. Mabel Willoughby. Robert H. Wilson. Mrs. John Xan. John 
Xan. 





Riley Hall 



Sorority Row 



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Snow COMES TO COLLEGE 



BoaJof TRUSTEES 



Joseph Linyer Bedsole ( 1942 i 
Divisional Vice-President, Mc- 
Kesson & Robbins, Inc.. Mobile 

Charles Renfroe Bell (1944) 
President, Commercial National 
Hank. Anniston 

William Andrew Berry (1942) 
Stale Manager, The Life Insur- 
ance Co. of Virginia, Birming- 
ham 

Virgil Bouldin < 1942 i 

Justice. Supreme Court of Ala- 
bama, Montgomery 
John Hall Bu< banan ( 194_>> 

Pastor, Southside Baptist 

Church. Birmingham 
J.rciKx Powell Burns (1942) 

Mayor of the City of Selma 
Ross Ernest Dillon (1942) 

Pastor, First Baptist Church. 

Troy 
Peyton Alfred Eubank | 1943) 

President, Peyton A. Eubank 

Real Estate & Insurance 

Inc., Ensley 



Mrs. J. E. Frank- i 1944) 

Fort Payne 
Virgil M. Gardner ( 1943) 

Pastor. First Baptist Church. 

I. a Fayette 
John Will Cay ( 194.? > 

Banker, Scottsboro 
Edwin White Hagood i 1942 i 

Pastor, First Baptist Church, 

Albertville 
Joseph Davis Heacoi k 1 1943) 

Physician, Birmingham 
J \mks Clarence [nzer < 1944 | 

Attorney, Gad 
Crawford Toy Johnson i 1944 I 

President. Crawford Johnson Co.. 

Inc.. Birmingham 
Henry J. Kittrell 1 1944) 

President. Kittrell-Milling Mo 

tor Company. Mobile 
Robert Eugene Lambert Sr 

l 194.') 

Planter and Merchant, R. E. 
Lambert & Sons. Darlington 
Mrs. C. Fuller Manly (1943) 
815 Essex Road. Birmingham 

I 20 j 



John I. MlLFORD ( 194.?) 

Pastor. First Baptist Chinch. 
I funtsville 

John RenFROE Mi i.i.ins (1944) 
J. R. Mullins & So,,-. 
Merchants. Clanton 

J. I). Pittman . 1943) 

President. J. I). Pittman Com- 
pany, Birmingham 

MEMORY I,. Robinson i 1944 I 
Attorney. Birmingham 

♦Benjamin Russi 1 1. i 1943 | 
President. The Russell Manufac- 
turing Company and allied inter- 
Alexander Cit\ 

Frank Park Samfosd | 1944) 
President, Liberty National Life 
Insurance Co.. Birmingham 

Lewe H. Sessions (1943) 

President. Sessions Company. 
Inc.. Manufacturers. Enterprise 
Jambs T. Upchur* b ( 1944) 

Secretarj -Treasurer. Interstate 

Oil Company, Montgomery 
James Alto W uto 1 1942 i 
Phj sician, Birmingham 



VL STUDENT 




MARJORIE HoI.Com i; 
Vice President 



Donald Adcock 
President 



Claire Conerlv 
Treasurer 



\.\.\ Weaver 
Secretary 



THE STUDENT SENATE 



The Student Senate is the highest student gov- 
ernment group at Howard. It is directly re- 
sponsible for the administration of the affairs 
of the student body and the expenditure of stu- 
dent Funds. Also it selects the student mem- 
bers of the Student Publications Board. Its 
officers are elected by the student body in the 
spring elections. The senators are elected by 
the clashes in their respective meetings. 

The Student .Senate has managed the student 
body affairs well during the past year under 
the leadership of Donald Adcock. our congenial 
and popular president. Marjorie Holcomb serv- 
ed as vice-president of the student panel, Ann 
Weaver acted as secretary, and Claire Conerly 
was the treasurer. 

There are ten senators with a preponderance of 
power concentrated in the hands of the senior 



class which has four senators. The junior class 
has three representatives, the sophomore class 
selects two members, and the freshman elas- 
elects one senator. 

SENIOR CLASS 

Sue B Ian ton 
Billy ('.win 
lean McDaniel 
Billy Riddle 

JUNIOR CLASS 

Kay Atchison 
I )oris Godwin 
John Richardson 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 

Johhny Christopher 
John Pittman 

FRESHMAN CLASS 
Louise Parker 



22 



GOVERNMENT 



WOMEN'S STUDENT GOVERNMENT 



The Women's Student Government was found- 
ed on the Howard campus under the deanship 
of -Miss French Haynes. The purpose of this 
organization is to integrate the different wom- 
en's groups in sponsoring a social program. Its 
membership is composed of all the women on 
the campus. 

The Women's Student Government is the 
principal governing body for women on the 
campus. Mrs. I. R. Obenchain, dean of wom- 
en, is the sponsor. It is distinguished from 
other governing organizations in that its func- 
tion is purely social, rather than political. Its 
policy is controlled by the council which is 
headed by Kathervn Abercrombie. The coun- 
cil is made up of the presidents of all women's 
organizations at Howard. 

Women's Student Government sponsors dis- 
cussions of the problems of women students 
and fosters programs of a cultural nature. Its 
activities include the entire contingent of wom- 
en students. During freshman orientation they 
gave valuable assistance to the women students. 

Seated: Jean McDaniel, Louise Parker, Claire Conerly, Donald Adcock, Marjorie Holcomb, 

Ann Weaver, Doris Godwin, 
Standing: Kay Atchison, Hilly Kiddle, John Pittman, Audrey Granade, John Christopher. 





Bditoi 
[I >NES \'l VGER 




5L 19 4 2 E N T R E 



. Issistant Editor 
IKAX McDANIEL 




Sports Editor 
\\ ENDELL GIVENS 




Here arc our faces. Our activities, Our teachers, for the 
year 1 ! > 4 v? in this, the twenty-eighth volume of The Entre 
Nous. Realizing that nothing remains the same, we have 
made a record of how we look, of what we did. this year. 
Bui we pray that we may not be satisfied with our conditions 
as represented here; we trust we may not habitually look 
hack to these pages for consolation from future defeats. For 
what we are now is no help to what we should be — then. 

By some of these names there are long lists of student ac- 
tivities, and you who are not closely acquainted with these 
people may think that they sure are energetic. And by some ot 
these names you may see nothing hut a home town and you 
may think that really and truly here are the nobodies of the 
class. 

But don't you believe in this manner. For many of our so- 
called "Student Activities" are realh "Student Inactivity 
and many of our "Participating students." the apparent ants 
ot our campus, are just good hypocrites who can smile and 
say "Hello" in a very engaging voice. And many of our 
apparent grasshoppers are students who have to work and 
therefore don't have time to go to a meeting at which few 
are present and little is done. 



I 24 I 



Editor-in- C 'h ief — J o n ks X i AG i: k 
Business Manager — GEORGE FlNDLAY 
Assistant Editor — Jean Camber McDaniel 

Sports Editor — Wendell GlVENS 

Assistant Sports Editor — Charles Niagek 

Feature Writers — Stewart Bell, ReES Wat- 
kins, Martha Hagood, LibbiE RhaE Mc- 
1 JONNELL 

Organization Editors — Sara Sugg, Jane Mur- 
I'HV, MlAGEORGE MANGUM 

Snap Shots — Stanley Bentley, "Doc" Wes- 
son, Jim mii-; Beasley, Wendell GivEns 

Photographers — Tommie Hill, John Dodd, 
Stanley Bentley 

Society Editors — Ira Gunn, Mary Kath- 
ERixK FiNLEY, Mary Elizabeth Clapper. 
Frances McDaniel 



N OU S... 




Business Manager 
GEORGE FIXDLAY 



Senior Class Editors — LihbiE Rhae McDon- 
nell. Roscoe Goldsmith, Doris E. 

S M ALLEY 

Junior Class Editors — Betsy BARNES, Ray 
VfCHISON 



Sophomore Class Editors — Edytiie WlNSPER, 
Mary Virginia Gregory, Betty McCooi 

Freshman Class Editors — Edna Jane Ben- 
nett, Mary Pearson 

Typing — Edythe WinspER, Libbie Rhae Mc- 
Donnell, Betty McCool 



THE ENTRE 
NOUS STAFF 




Editor 
ANNE SCANNELLY 




VL HOWARD 



The I Inward Crimson is the weekly newspaper 
of the College. The paper this year, in its 
twenty-seventh year of publication, was under 
the management of Anne Scannelly, Senior 
English .Major, and Journalism Student. We 
Feel that the Crimson has been more this year 
than in several years, in keeping with the 
spiritual tone of the College. 

We also think that the paper was representa- 
tive of the entire student body. If -nine groups 
felt that they didn't receive their share of puh- 
licity, it was probably because these groups 
have received more than their share in previous 
years. And we wish to extend to Anne Scan- 
nelly our congratulations tor making the lust <<i 
what she had to work with. 

The Business Manager for the first part of the 
year was Dudley Watkins who resigned his 
job to Frances C.alhreath. Both business man- 
agers secured more advertisements than the 
paper could carry and still have a good ap- 
pearance. 



Business Manager 
FRANCES GALBREATH 




I 26 I 



Editor — A n x k Sca n n elly 

Business Manager — Frances ( iAlbreath 

Assistant Editor — J ban McDaniel 

Columnists — George Bagley, Tommie Hill 

Sports Editors — Wendell Givens, Murrell 
Johnson 

Society Editors — Mary Katherine Fixley, 
Frances McDaniEL. Martha Stokes 



Feature Writers — Reese Watkixs, Kath- 

ERIXE BlJRNHAM, MARY FEARSOX, CHARLES 

Niac.ER, Martha Hagood 

News Writers — Doris Wales, Gerald Tid- 
weel, John Dodd, Sarah Howell, Sarah 
McNeill, Edna Jane Bennett 

Fraternity Editor — Ira Gunn 



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The Crimson Staff 




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BOARD 




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icauon 



The Student Publications Board was set up by the constitution of 1939, which 
stipulated thai this panel should consist of the dean of the college; the head of the 
economics department, who is to act as treasurer ; and three student members elected 
annually by the Student Senate. They are to have full control over the busines 
the publications. They appoint the business managers of the Entre Nous, The 
Howard Crimon, and the Bull Pup. The board for the past year lias consisted 
of Dean P. I'. Burns; Dr. Prank Bain, head of the Department of Economics; 
Kenny Baker, star athlete; Carey Gwin, pharmacy major and student politician. 
Billy Kiddle, chairman of the committee is fitted for this position by virtue of hav- 
ing served as editor of both the Bull Pup and the Crimosn. 



Seated: 1 'can Burns, Billy Riddle 

Standing: Kenny Baker, Dr. Baine, Carey Gwin 




[ 28 ] 



SNAPS 



First Row: An old fashioned fool washing. 
Somebody asleep while Mr. Causey is talk- 
ing? Three Bull Dogs. 

Second Row: Hoping some boys will come in. 



Working on the Entre Nous. Wonder who'll 
unwrap these presents? 

Third Row: Santa must have fun. Four ener- 
getic Entre Nous Staff members, four more. 
Three escaped convicts visit the campus. 

Fourth Row: The suckers. Three graduates 
pursue their life's work. Two points. Look 
for the Iamb. 




First Row: Find Billy Burns . . . "Any mail for George Truett Hagood?" 
. . . Fighting over a woman. 

Second Row: A married woman . . . Lincoln and John Wilkes Booth . . . Mar- 
garet Ward and Billy Gwin. 

Thin! Row: "Please Anne, One More" . . . Waiting, Knowles cowles along . . . 
Wonder why .Margie is in the park? 








SNAPS 

First Row: Howard's loviest couple, a busy 
moment during surveying class, The Pikes 
sign tif > for some publicity, "Two smiles of 
beauty." 



Second Row: Once more Southern sneaks in, 
Standi fer sitting down, Dr. Patty and the 
polishing Pikes, "Small Fry". 

Third Row: Tarrant tackled at last. Hey 
Gracie! O. Henry, Goodlett let in again. 

/■'mirth Row: Look on Jelly's belly !. a Rhodes 
Scholar, ferity. 



I 32 | 




First time: Reading the Crimson. A photog- 
rapher visits Dean Dale in his cell. Nothing 
important. 

Second Row. What a cruel man. Papa I tolley 
prepares n> "change" the baby. "1 don't know 
what to play." 



Third Row: Betsy and little Dave. He sure 
'nough must have something. The queen and 
two Knights. 

Fourth Row: Two Killian play boys. They 
call her "Hammie", Two Lamda Cows. 



I 33 | 



SNAPS 

First Row: The Queen is crowned. Tarrant's 
off again. Jack, Gene, Juanita. 

Second Row: Waiting for Miss Willoughby 



to bury the pet cat. R. A. F. Pursuits. Catch- 
ing up on Super Man. 

Third Rozv. 'Sno time for play. The bright 
Sigma Nu's thumb a parked car. Going to 
"the house." 

Fourth Rozu: Ferdinand is loose. The sisters 
sallv forth. Morning- watch. 




First Roiv : He actually smiled. Goodlet lets Lane in on another lie. Guess who. 

Second Rem': "Toni." Well, it snowed again. "The Great Black Bear." Where's 

his mother-in-law ? 

Third Row: "Cat Hunting." Sir Lancelot. Billy bites. The Monk. 





SNAPS 

First Row: Now she's married to somebody 
else. The thinker. The Patriots. Dr. Love- 
grins". 



Second Row. Nothing else to do. Wonder 
what she said: Looks like a rooster Eight. 

Third Row. "Good morning to you, Sir". 

"Texas" and the U. S. Do von see anything 

funny? Pull that shade down. Lackey 

latches. 



[ 36 ] 




First Row. I '.cant v. The Peanut Gallery. 

Second Row: Whal a piece of work is man! "The little minister". We oughta gotta cut. 

Third Row. Sleepy time gals. "Good night." Away, from the noise of fourth avenue. 



WHO'S WHO atJL.nl 



Most Popular Boy 

Most Popular Girl 



David Drake 
Ann Weaves 



Miss Howard Marjorie Ethei Holcomb 

Most Promising Boy Maury I.i nckforu 

Most Intellectual Girl Sue Smith 

Most Intellectual Hoy Clarence Slaughter 

Most Promising Girl Anne S> vnnelly 

Most Beautiful Girl Katherine Burnham 



Most Handsome Boy 

Wittiest Boy 

Best Ail-Around Girl 

Wittiest Girl 

Best Ail-Around Boy 

Best Pressed Hoy 

Best Dressed Girl 



Bill Culbreath 

Wendell Givens 

Helen Cagle 

Margaret Lee Monroe 

David Drake 

a Hodges 

Sue Smith 




HOWARD CLs 




SENIORS 



Roscoe Goldsmith, Makv Allen Yancey, 
George Hagood. Frances Goodrich 




Odell Bennett, Ann Gatlin, 
James Sharman, Jimmy Beasley 



JUNIORS 



40 



OFFICERS... 




Carolyn Gates, Margaret Lee Monroe, 
(ane Murphy, Betty Prince 



SOPHOMORES 




FRESHMEN 



Betty I ).wis, Jon \ Crow k. 
Mary Gilliland, Mary Pearson 



^Jke (^Ic 



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/ 1 9 4 2 



.\I.\k\ Katiikyn Abercrombie English- 
Presidenl Women's Student Government 1: 
Treasurer Y. \Y. C. A. 1; President Freshman 
Committee I ; Y. \V. C. A. Cabinet 1. 2, 3, I; 
Y Group Leader :i ; Assistant Editor Fresh- 
man Crimson I ; Hypatia I; Bull Pup Staff 2 ; 
Booklovers 1. 2, 3,4 ; Library Staff I. 2, 3, I ; 
Glee Club I : Who's Who Among Students in 
American Universities and Colleges. Birming- 
ham. Ala. 



EVERETT ABLES -Mathematics — Y. M. C A. 
Entre Nous Staff 1. Geraldine, Ala. 



Marion Absher — Religion- 
ciation. Blountsville, Ala. 



Ministerial Asso- 



Donald Adcock Lambda Chi Alpha — Math- 
ematics—President Student Body 1; President 
Lambda Chi Alpha ; President Physical Society 
2, :>, 4; President Junior Class .'5; Treasurer 
Lambda Chi Alpha :S ; Who's Who Among 
Students in American Universities and Col- 
leges. Gadsden, Ala. 



Weaver Allen 
Glee Club; Y. M. 



Sigma Xtt — Economics — 
C. A. Birmingham, Ala. 



S. Louis Armstrong — English — Alpha I'hi 
Omega — President Y. M. C. A. 2; Glee Club 
2, 3, 1; Ministerial Association; Mission Study 
Club ".'. 3; I'. S. U. Council 2, 3; Ushers Club 
1. 2 ; Vice-President Speech Arts Club; \ 
Capella Choir 3, 4 ; Air Raid Warden I ; Vice- 
President Alpha Phi Omega. Montgomery, 
Alabama. 

George Baglev — English — Alpha Phi Omega 
— Ministerial Association 1. 2, 3, 1; Y. M. C. 
A. 3, 1 ; Alpha Phi < >mega 3, I : Crimson Staff 
l. 2, 3, I ; Fairfield, Ala. 

Henry Ballard — Pi Kappa l'hi— Economics. 
Alexander Cit\ , Ala. 



[ 42 ] 



William Stewart Bell English- Glee 
Club 1. 2; International Relations Club 2, 3, 1 
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 2; Entre Nous Staff I 
Crimson Staff I; Trident 3; Mosquers 1 
Who's Who Among Students in American 
Universities and Colleges. Birmingham, Ala. 



Mrs. Lola F 

ham, Ala. 



Bellenger — English. Binning- 



James Odell Bennett Economics — Auditor 
1: Treasurer Junior Class; Ministerial Asso- 
ciation; Entre Nous Staff I. Heflin, Ala. 



York, 



FRED BERNANKE — Economics. Xi 
.Yew York. 

Borum Bishop — Economics — L. C. Smith 
Mathematics Medal; Trident. Montgomery, 

Alabama. 

Sue Blanton — Alpha Delta Pi — English — 
Vice-President Alpha Delta Pi 3; President 
Alpha Delta Pi 1 ; Y. W. C. A.; Treasurer 
Student Body •"> ; Student Senate 3, i : 1'an- 
Hellenic Council 3, I; Wesley Foundation; 
Who's Who Among Students in American 
Universities and Collegi - 

C,iRu:\ Ray Bowen — English — Y. M. C. A. 
I torton, Ala. 



Carl Folds 




Abkkckomkik 
Ables 
Absher 



Adcock 

Allen 

Armstrong 



Bagley 

Ballard 
Bell 



Bellencer 
Bennett 
Bernanke 



Bishop 
Blanton 
Bo wen 




a 



t HOWARD COLLEGE 



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/ 19 4 2 



Bern ice Brown Beta Sigma Omicron 
Spanish- -Y. W. C. A.; Booklovers; W. A. A.; 
Crimson Staff 3. Birmingham, Ala. 



Eugene Brow n -Chemistry — Pharmacy Club; 
Laboratory Instructor in Pharmacy; Labora- 
tory Instructor in Pharmocognosy. Manches- 
ter. Georgia. 



Elizabeth I Iai.i. Burdick — Dietetics — Die- 
tetics Club 1. 2, :>. 1; Reporter Dietetics Club 
1: Vice- 1 'resident Dietetics Club :> ; Glee Club 
3, 4 ; V. \V. C. A. 3, 4. Birmingham, Ala. 



Walkkr By mm — Religion — 15. S. I*. ; V. M. 
C. A.; Ministerial Association. Decatur. Ala. 



Sarah Ceravolo — Religious Education — W. 
C. L'.; V. W. C. A.: B. S. I". Council 3, \ : 
I'.. S. 1; Mission Study Band; Dormitory 
Council. Birmingham, Ala. 



Carroll Clayton — l'i 
acy. Bellamy, Ala. 



Kappa Phi — Pharnt- 



Embry Coalson — Pharmacy — Georgia Tech ; 
Southern College of Pharmacy. Atlanta. Ga. 
Burton Colev — Pre-Medicine — Piedmont 
College 1. •-': V. M. C. A. Ranburne, Ala. 



\.\sii COLLIER, Jr. — Chemistry — Trident 4; 
Scholarship Day 1. 2, :'> ; Chi Alpha Sigma '-'. 
:!. 1; Physical Society; Who's Who Among 
Students in American Universities and Col- 
leges 1: Laboratory Instructor 1. *.'. '■'>. 1. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 



I H 1 



Manley LaFayette Cummins— Pi Kappa 
Phi — Chemistry — Laboratory Instructor in Bi- 
ology 1; Alpha Epsilon Delta 4; University of 
Alabama 1. 2, •'!. Ashford, Ala. 



David Drake — History — President Y. M. C. 
A.; President II Club; First Vice-President 
I'.. S. I". Council: Ministerial Association; Al- 
ternate Captain Football Team 4; Football 1. 
•-'. 3, 4; Basketball 1. 2, 3, 4; H Club ■>. 3, 4: 
Blue Cray Game 1; Howard Who's Who 4; 
Cross Roads. Ala. 



GEORGE B. Findlay — Chemistry — Business 
.Manager Entre Nous 4. Birmingham, Ala. 



Raymond DeWitt FLETCHER — Lambda Chi 
Alpha — History — Auburn 1. 2. Gadsden, Ala. 



Carl Folds — Social Science — Football 1. 2, •'!. 
I; Basketball 1; 11 Club 2, 3, 1. Hanceville. 
Alabama. 



LONNIE W. FuNDERBURG — Pharmacy. Annis- 

ton. Ala. 



Libby Rhai: McDonald 





^99 \ 

' Mm 



Brown 
Brown 

BURDICK 



Bynum 

Ceravolo 
Clayton 



Coalson 

COLEY 

Collier 



Cum mins 
Drakk 

FlNDLAY 



Fletcher 
Folds 

FlJNDERBURG 





a 



t HOWARD COLLEGE 



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>E Parkkr - ". ith — Economics — 

Alpha Phi g 3 .ary Alpha Phi Ome- 

- ; Vice-] 
dent Sophom Club 1. 2, -\ 4; 

Aib 1. 2; Band 1. 2; Y. M. C. A 
Entre Nous S . • ; Managing Editor 

Entre X us 2; Glee Club Librarian 4. At- 
more. Ala. 

Fr.w - m>rich — Alpha Delta Pi — English 

— Y. W. C. A. Presidei" - rretary Senior 

- uers; Wesley Foundation Council : 

_ - iry Alpha I^elta Pi 4 : 'I 

urer Alpha Delta Pi 3 ; Chaplain Alpha Delta 

aiding Secretary Alpha Delta Pi ; 

Birmingham. Ala. 

Aldrv GranadE — A Education — Atr- 

letic Chairman Ministerial Association; Minis- 
terial Association. Frankville. Ala. 

CiEXE GrOGAN — History — President W. A. A. 
3; Badminton Champion 2, "> : Treasurer Art 
Club 2; President Art Club •*>. Birmingham. 
Alabama. 

Ira Gv.nx — Pi Kappa Phi — Economics — Pres- 
ident Pi Kappa Phi 4: Glee Club 1. -2. Alex- 
ander City. Ala. 

GussrE Mae Guyton — English — Blue V 
tain 1; B. S. U. Council 1, 2, 3; Y. \Y. A. 

lent 4: Y. \V. C. A. Cabinet :i ; B 
lover- . Alexander City. Ala. 

Billy GwiN — Sigma \u — English — Student 
Council "2; Yice-President Masqu lead 

Cheer Leader 2, 3 ; Glee Club 2, :i : U. M. C. A. 

Cabinet tball 1. Be>>emer. Ala. 

George Truett Ha<;ood — Pre-Medicine — Al- 
pha Phi Omega — Chi Alpha Sigma 2, :>. 4 ; 
President Alpha Phi On* - : Vice-] 

dent Senior - Tallapoosa. Ga. 

Ruth Harris — Biology — Tudson 1; Alpha 
Epsilon Delta: Y. \Y. A. Cabinet: B. S. U. 
Council. ; ro, Ala. 



/ 1 9 4 2 



Gerou Hodges — Sigma Xu — Economics — 
all 1. "J: Basketball 1. 2 : Student Publi- 
cation Board 3. Birmingham, Ala. 

Mar.torie Holcomb — Phi Mu — English — 
Vice-President Y. W. C. A. 4; Vice-President 

Phi Mu :'. : President Phi Mu 4; Vice-Presi- 
dent Student Body 4; Masquers -\ 4: Crimson 
Staff 2, :< : Beauty Section -.'. :! ; Miss How- 
ard: Hyj^atia 4; Women's Pan-Hellenic Coun- 
cil :?. 4: Entre Nous Staff t: Delta Kappa ".' ; 
Who's Who Among Students in American 
Universities and Colleger-. Birmingham, Ala. 

Eugene Alberto Holmes, III — Lambda Chi 

Alpha — Mathematics — Chi Alpha Sutna : 
Physical Society: Trident 4; Who's Who 
Among Students in American Universities and 
Colleges: Alpha Phi Omega; Honor Student. 
Birmingham. Ala. 

Vivian Houumtch — English — Y. W". C. A. 
Cabinet 1. "2. 1. 4: Glee Club :?. 4; Yice-Presi- 
dent French Clas> ; May Day Honor Court 1; 
Student Senate "2; Library Staff 1. *.'. ">. 
Birmingham. Ala. 

Chari.es Hillmax Hundley — English — 
Ministerial Association. Birmingham. Ala. 

v Jackson — Social Science — fudson 1,2; 
Y. W. C. A .: Y. W. A. Thomasvi'lle. Ala. 



I.OXXIH FlNPERBURG 




fN I 





Goldsmith 

Goodrich 
Granade 



Grog an 
Gunn 
Guyton 



Gwin 

Hagood 
Harris 



1 IodgES 
Holcomh 
Holmes 



I [OULDITCH 
I [UNDLEY 

Jackson 




a 



t HOWARD COLLEGE 



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Mary Ella James Mathematics — Treasurer 
rlypatia I; President Wesley Foundation 1 ; 
Vice-President Beta Pi Theta l; Booklovers; 
Y. \V. C. A. Cabinet I ; Glee Club 1. 2, 3, I ; 
A Capella Choir; Who's Who Among Stu- 
dents in American Universities and Colleges. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

June Ray Jones — Phi Mu- English — V. W. 
C. A. Cabinet; B. S. I'.; Booklovers. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 

Eugene Jordan — English — Y. M. C. A.; B. 
S. U. Council; .Music Chairman A Capella 
Choir. Birmingham, Ala. 

Sara |ori>an -Mathematics — Glee Club; A 
Capella Choir; Y. W. C. A.; W. A. A.; Y. T. 
C. Birmingham, Ala. 

Tom Jordan — Pi Kappa Phi — Pharmacy— 
Kappa Psi. Guntersville, Ala. 

Dewey I.. Lackey, Jr. — Pi Kappa Phi — 
Chemistry — Chi Alpha Sigma. Birmingham, 
Alabama. 

Amos LedbETTER — English — Y. M. C. A.; 

Ministerial Association. Trussville. Ala. 



I ,s 



/ 1 9 4 2 



Mrs. Emma LEE — English. Birmingham, Ala. 1 

Evan I.. Lewis — Pi Kappa Phi — Chemistry — 
Band 1 ; Chi Alpha Sigma 2, 3, 1 ; Alpha Ep- 
silon Delta 2, 3, 1: Vice-Pesident Alpha Ep- 
silon 2) President Alpha Epsilon Delta 3, 4; 
Student Affiliate American Chemical Society; 
Marshal 3; Dramatics '- ; Laboratory Instruc- 
tor in Chemistry and Biology; Alpha 1'hi 
( )mega 3, 4. Atlanta. Ga. 

Lloyd August Lovegren- Alpha Phi Omega 

— Chemistry — Alpha Epsilon Delta; Chi Alpha 
Epsilon; Y. T. C. 2, 3, 1; Mission Band 2, 3, 
4: 1'.. S. I". Council 3; Glee Club 2, 3; A Ca- 
pella Choir 3, 4 ; Trident. Birmingham, Ala. 



Mildred E. Lovegren — Religious Education 
University of Minnesota I; Bethel Junior 
College 2] Bethel Seminary •'!. 1 : (dee Club 1 : 
Chi Delta Phi 1. Birmingham, Ala. 

Helen Malone - English — Booklovers ; Y. 
W. C. A.; Library Staff. Birmingham, Ala. 

Edwin McBrayer — I'i Kappa Phi — Phar- 
macy. Bass, Ala. 

Charles McCain — History Ministerial As- 
sociation; President Ministerial Association I; 

Y. M. C. A. Arley. Ala. 

JEAN Cam BER McDANlEL — Journalism — Pres- 
ident llypatia 1; Student Senate I; Assistant 
Editor Crimson I; Feature Editor Crimson 2, 
•'! ; Co-Editor Freshman Edition Crimson I; 
Assistant Editor Junior Edition Crimson :'> : 
Assistant Editor Entre Nous 1; News Editor 
3; Bull Pup Staff 3; Honors Day 1. 2, 3, I ; 
Marshal 1. 2, 3; President Chi Delta Phi 3; 
President Pi Kappa Theta I : Secretary Y. W. 
C. A. 3; Publicity Chairman Y. W. C. A. I; 
College Publicity Staff :!. 1 ; International Re- 
lations Club 3, 1; Secretary International Rela- 
tions Club 4 ; Who's Who Among Students in 
American Universities and Colleges; Repre- 
sentative on Library Senior Committee; Candi- 
date for Degree with Honors in English. 
Jirminerham, Ala. 



Vivian Norton 




J \ MK.S 

Jones 

Jordan 



S. Jordan 
T. Jordan 
Lackey 



Ledbetter 
Lee 
Lewis 



L. Lovegren 
M. Lovegren 
Maeone 



McBrayer 
McCain 
McDaniei 




a 



t HOWARD COLLEGE 



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/ 1 9 4 2 



Libbie Rhea McDonell Biology Treas- 
urer Dietetics Club 3; Alpha Omicron; Entre 
Nous Staff l. Birmingham, Ala. 

Jack Daniel McLENDON Lambda Chi Al- 
pha — Chemistry — Secretary Lambda Chi Al- 
pha I: Chi Alpha Sigma; Physical Society; 
Men's Pan-Hellenic; Student Affiliate- of 
American Chemical Society. Birmingham, Ala. 
Mrs. Lucille Morrison — History — Jackson- 
ville State Teacher's College L 2. Trussville, 
Alabama. 

CURTIS NELMS — English — Ministerial Asso- 
ciation; Y. M. C. A. Alabama City. Ala. 
Roy Jones Niager — English — Student Senate 
:! ; Internationa] Relations Club :i ; Treasurer 
International Relations Club 1 ; Kappa Phi 
Kappa •'! ; Secretary Kappa Phi Kappa 1; 
Crimson Staff, Editor Junior Class Edition oi 
Crimson; Junior Class Editor of Entre Nous; 
Editor-in-Chief Entre Nous; Who's Who 
Among Students in American Universities and 
Colleges; Delta Kappa 3. Atlanta. Ga. 
Vivian Norton — Alpha Delta I'i; Vice Presi- 
dent Women's Pan-Hellenic Council ".' ; May 
Day Honor Court - : Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; 
Beauty Parade. Birmingham, Ala. 

Lucille Poole — Beta Sigma Omicron — His- 
tory. Leeds. Ala. 

George William Riddle— Pi Kappa Alpha 
— Economics — Football 1 ; Manager Spring 
Football 1. v ; Editor the Bullpup 2; Sports 
Editor Crimson 2 ; Sports Editor Entre Nous 2 ; 
Editor Sophomore Edition of Crimson 2; Edi- 
tor-in-Chief Crimson '■'> ; Vice-President Inter- 
national Relations Club 3; Secretary l'i Kappa 
Alpha 2; President Pi Kappa Alpha •'! : Treas- 
urer Pi Kappa Alpha I; Alpha Phi Omega :> ; 
Student Senate I ; Chairman Student Publica- 
tions Board t; Band I. Birmingham, Ala. 
Billy Roberts — Pharmacy — Kappa Psi; Sec- 
retary Kappa Psi; Laboratory Assistant in 
Pharmacy. Curlcy. Ala. 

KathErine Russell — Delta 2.&.Z.— Biology- 

President Delta Zeta 1; Historian and Editor 
mi' Delta Zeta '■'• ; Alabama College L 2; Secre- 
tary and Treasurer of Women's Student Gov- 



ernment 1: Entre Nous Staff :i : Y. W. V; 
Y. W. C. \. ; Pan-Hellenic Representative I. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

Norma Jeanne Sanders Beta Sigma Omi- 
cron — English — Treasurer Beta Sigma Omi- 
cron • > ; President Beta Sigma Omicron 1; 
Masquers 3, I ; Treasurer Masquers 1 ; Wom- 
en's Pan-Hellenic 3, I; Treasurer Women's 
Pan-Hellenic I; Y. W. C. A.; Booklovers. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

Anne ScannElly — Journalism — Crimson Ed- 
itor 1; Vice-President Junior Class; Vice- 
President Chi Delta Phi -\ : Vice-President Pi 
Kappa Theta 1; Vice-President Booklovers •'!; 
Howard's Must Promising Curl 1 ; Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet 2, .".. I; P.. S. L. Council :i ; Editor 
P.. S. I'. Paper :i ; Who's Who Anion- Stu- 
dents in American Colleges and Universities; 
Campus Representative at Pi Kappa Alpha 
Dinner Honoring Outstanding Girls on Cam- 
pus L Bessemer, Ala. 

Evelyn Scarbrough -Alpha Delta Pi — Eng- 
lish — Ward-Belmont 1. 2; Dormitory Council 
3, 1 ; Glee Club; A Capella Choir 3, 4; Y. W. 
A. Albertville, Ala. 

KathErine Reynolds Sims — Phi Mu — Eng- 
lish — Y. W. C. A.; Art Club. Birmingham, 
Alabama. 

Doris Kaki.k S m ALLEY — English — Blue Moun- 
tain 1. 2, 3; P.. S. U. Council 1 ; Glee Club i; 
Entre Nous Staff 1 : V". W. C. A. Council 1. 
Fort Payne. Ala. 

Sarah CERAVOLO 




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mcdonell 
McLendon 
Morrison 



N F.L.MS 
NlAGER 

Norton 



Poole 
Riddle 
Roberts 



Russell 
Scan nelly 

Sanders 



scarbrough 

Sims 
Sm alley 




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/ 1 9 4 2 



O.m-.i: Spear Religion Ministerial Asso- 
ciation; Glee Club, 2, :> ; A Capella Choir 3, I : 

Y. M. I'. A.: Mis-ion Hand :i. Lanette, Ala. 



William Woodrow 
History Football 1. 



aylor — Sigma Nu — 

3, I. Wedowee, Ala. 



Kathryn Staples Thomas — English — [ud- 
son College 1. 2; Y. W. C. A.; Y. W. A. 3; 
Booklovers. Birmingham, Ala. 

Florrie Thom i'sii.n — Phi Mn — Mathematics 

Y. W. I'. A. Cabinet :'>. 1; Secretary Y. W. 
C. A. 1 : Treasurer Phi Mn 1 ; Treasurer Chi 
Delia Phi ■! : President Women's Studenl 
Government •> ; Assistant Editor Bull Pun 2; 



Booklovers 1. 2; Y. W. C. A. 
Hypatia 3, 1. Birmingham, Ala. 



1. 



M \kv Elizabeth Walker — English- 
's. P. 3. Birmingham, Ala. 



3. 1 



-S. I. 



Edwina Wallace — Alpha Delta Pi — Social 
■Science— Huntingdon College 1. '! : Y. \Y. 

C. A. Cabinet 1. Power Peach Tree. Ala. 

1 )oris Walls — English — President Booklovers 
\; President Chi Delta Pi: Assistant Editor 
Entre Nous '■> : Wesley Foundation :i. I; Li- 
brary Staff 1. 2, :5. 1: Editor Freshman Edi- 
tion Crimson; Editor Sophomore Edition 
Crimson; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet •'!. 1; News 
Editor Crimson 1, .'i. 1: Publicity Officer 
Y. W. C. A.; Wesley Foundation; College 
Publicity Agent -k P Birmingham, Ala. 

REESE Watkins — English — Chi Delta Phi :5. 
1: Masquers •>. I: Entre Nous Staff :>. 4: 
Crimson Staff 1. 2, \ ; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 
3, 1 : Booklovers 1. 2, 3, 1 ; Y. W. A. 1. 2, 3, 
1: Y. T. C. 3; W.C.V. 2, 3, 1; (dec Club 3, I 
( >xford. Ala. 

Anne Weaver — English — Student Senate ; 
President W. C. V. '■> : Secretary Junior Class; 
Hypatia; Secretary Student Body 1; B. S. P. 
Council ■.'. 3, I: President B. S U. I; Book- 
lovers 2; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 1. 2, •!. I : 



(dee Club i : Vice-President Alabama B. S. I'. 
:i ; Dormitory Council 'i, 3; Secretary Dormi- 
tory Council '■'>; Most Popular Girl 1; Who's 
Who Among Students in American Universi- 
ties and Colleges. Talladega, Ala. 

Audrey Welch — English — Booklovers L, 2, 
•'!. I : Treasurer Booklovers 1 : Crimson Staff 
3; Y. W. C. A. 1. 2, 3, 1. Birmingham, Ala. 

W. II. Williams — Economics — Band 1. 2, ;>. 
Montgomery, Ala. 

Durwood Williamson — Historx — Football 

1. 2, 3, t; Basketball 1 : Baseball L, 2; H Club 

2, :i. 4. Selma, Ala. 

Stewart Winton — Pi Kappa Phi — Chemis- 
try — Trident: Alpha Epsilon Delta; Chi Alpha 
Sigma. Birmingham, Ala. 

Mary Ellen YancEy — English — Y. W. A. 

1. 2, 3, 1 ; President Y. W. A. 2, 3; P.. S. P. 
Council 2, .'!. I: Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 2, 3; 
W.A.A. 1. 2; Booklovers P 2, •!. I: Y. T. C. 

•i ; W. C. I*. '!. :i. D President Senior Clas- 
Camp Hill. Ala. 

Sara Ruth Young — English — Hypatia: Pres- 
ident Beta Pi Theta; Secretary Beta Pi Theta 

3; Chi Delta Phi: Secretary Chi Delta Phi 2; 
Crimson Staff 1; Honor Roll :i ; Y. W. C. A. 
•'!. P Birmingham, Ala. 



( )i)i:i.L Bennett 




SpE a r 
Taylor 

'I' IK (MAS 



Thompson" 
Walker 
Wallace 



Walls 

W ATKINS 

Weaver 



Welch 
Williams 
Williamson 



Winton 

V.wiHv 
Young 




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VLLEN 

\\ni RTON 

Arnold 

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\i STON 

K Baker 
S Baker 
Barnes 

I'. \KK<>\\ 



Be vsley 

H K N Mil 
Bl \CK 

Row i:\ 
Broadwell 



Bryan 
burkhalter 

Bl RKS 
Bl RNS 

Cacle 



I'.. Carter 
R. Carter 
Cocgin 

COLLEY 
COMPTON 



CONERLY 

Cooper 

O'KK 
CORLEY 

Deason 



Dow ELL 
I'.l FKI.DT 
I-'.liW ARDS 

C. Ellis 
J Ellis 




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DL J U N I O R CLm 



Marion Albright — Pharmacy — Alpha Phi Omega — 

B. S. U. Council. 2, 3 ; V. M. C. A. Talladega, Ala. 
Mary Virginia Allen — liiu/lish — Chi Delta Phi — 
B. S. U. Council, 2, 3; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, 2. 3: 
May Day Honor Court, 1; Booklovers ; Scholar- 
ship Day, 2: W. C. V. Birmingham, Ala. 
Martha Anderton — English — Y. W. C. A.. 1. 3; W. 
A. A., 1. Birmingham, Ala. 

Clarence J. Arnold — English — Ministerial Ass'n. 
Scottsboro, Ala. 

Ray Atchison — English — Vice President, Freshman 
Class: Treasurer, Sophomore Class: May Day 
Honor Court. 1: Crimson Staff, 1, 2, 3: Entre 
Nous Staff. 2. 3: Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, 2; Hull Pup 
Staff, 2 : Student Senate. 3 : President Kappa Phi 
Kappa, 3; B. S. U. Council, 3: Student Library 
Committee, 3: Honor Roll, 1, 2. Underwood, Ala. 
Mary Auston — Phi Mu — Dietetics — Vice-President. 
Dietetics Club ; Phi Mu Pledge Secretary. Birming- 
ham, Ala. 

Kenny BakER — Social Science and Sociology — Foot- 
ball. 1, 3, 4; Basketball, 1. 2. 3, 4: H-Ckib. 3. 4: 
Student Publications Board, 4 ; Honor Court, 2. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

Selina Baker — Alpha Delta Pi — English — Treas- 
urer, Alpha Delta Pi: Beauty Parade; Y. W. C. A. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

Betsy Barnes — English — Glee Club. 2. 3: A Ca- 
pella Choir. 2. 3; Dormitory Council. 3: Y. W. A.. 
2, 3; B. S. L\ Council, 3; Beauty Parade, 3: Sec- 
retary, A Capella Choir. 3; Entre Nous Staff. 3: 
Huntingdon, 1. Montgomery, Ala. 
BEVERLY Barrow — Phi Mu — English — Glee Club; 
Y. W. C. A. Birmingham, Ala. 

James Malcolm BEASLEY, Jr. — English — Ministerial 
Ass'n, 1, 2, 3: Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. 2. 3; Band, 1: 
Ushers Club, 1; Y. T. C. ; 15. S. I". Council, 2, 3; 
Band, 1; Entre Nous Staff, 3; Glee Club, 1. York, 
Alabama. 

Lor is Arm sTKo.xc, 




J. R. Bennett — Lambda Chi Alpha — History — Presi- 
dent. Y. M. C. A., 2. Holt. Ala. 
Charles Black — Lambda Chi Alpha — Economics — 
C A. A.: Y. M. C. A. Gadsden. Ala. 
Gl'Rley Ray Bowen — English — Band, 1 ; Glee Club, 

1. 2. 3; A Capella Choir, 2. 3; Y. M. C. A, 3; 
Ministerial Ass'n, 3. Horton. Ala. 

Margaret Aldean Broadwell — Alpha Delta Pi — 
Biology — Y. W. C. A., Cabinet. 3. Birmingham, Ala. 
Thomas Bryan — Sigma Nu — Economics — Student 
Senate, 1 : Student Publications Board, 2 ; Ushers 
Club: Y. M. C. A.: Treasurer, Sigma Nu. Elba, 
Alabama. 

Clarke Blrkh alter — History — Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Y. M. C. A.. 1. 2. 3. JemisoiL Ala. 
Gilbert Btrks — English. Calera. Ala. 
Mabel Pratt Blrns — English — Y. W. C. A. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 
Helen Cagle— Phi Mu— English— Y. W. C. A., 1, 

2, 3; Art Club. 1. 2: President, Phi Mu pledges, 1; 
Vice-President, Phi Mu ; Wesley Foundation. Bir- 
mingham. Ala. 

B. W. Carter — History — Mississippi State, 1 ; Min- 
isterial Ass'n. Atmore, Ala. 

Rosalind Carter — English — President. Masquers 
Club. Birmingham, Ala. 

James Pari. Cogcin — History — B. S. U. Council, 2; 
Ministerial Ass'n: Secretary, Ministerial Ass'n, 2; 
Y. M. C. A.; V T. C. Birmingham, Ala. 
Berta Gibus Colley — Alpha Delta Pi — Sociology; 
Troy State Teachers College, 1. 2 Troy. Ala. 
Richard Compton — Economics — football ; Basket- 
ball ; Track team. Montgomery, Ala. 
Claire Conerly — Pre-Medicine — Alpha Epsilon Del- 
ta. 2. 3: Crimson Staff. 1; Y. \Y. C. A.. 1. 3; 
Booklovers. 1, 3; Treasurer, Student Body, 3. Jack- 
son, Ala. 

Flonnie Cooper — Biology — Alpha Epsilon Delta, 1, 
2. 3: Chi Alpha Sigma, 2, 3; \Y. A. A., 1. 2. 3: 
Booklovers, 2, 3; Y. W. C. A.. 2. 3. Birmingham, 
Ala 

Robert Francis Cork — Pi Kappa M^Ya— Economics 
Alpha Phi Omega. 2. 3: Secretary, Pi K. V. 2; 
Rush Chairman, 3; Y. M. C. A., 1. 2. 3; Men's Pan- 
Hellenic, 3: A Capella Choir. 2. 3; Glee Club, 1. 2, 5. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

Paul Corley — Pi Kappa Alpha — Economies. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 

J M. Deason — Sigma Nu — Economics — Business 
Manager, Entre Nous. 2. Birmingham, Ala. 
Arthur M. Dow ell— Pi Kappa Phi — Chemical En- 
gineering — Chi Alpha Sigma. Birmingham, Ala. 
Ralph Edeeldt Lambda Chi Aloha Economic — 
Glee Club; \ Capella Choir; Birmingham-Southern 
1. 2. Birmingham, Ala, 

Elizabeth Shelton Edwards— Phi Mu — Journalism 
Birmingham-Southern, 1: Y, W, C. A.; Crimson 
Stafi. 3; Glee Club. Birmingham, \la. 
Carl Ellis Pi Kappa Phi — Economics. Brantley, 

Alabama. 

.1. T. Ellis I'i Kappa Phi Economics. Birming- 
ham, Ala. 

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Grace Ezeli. — English — Chi Delta Phi; Delta Kappa 
Vice-President; Y. W. C. A.. 1, 2, 3; Honors' Day, 

1, 2; Marshall, 1, 2; Secretary, Booklovers, 3; 
President, International Relations Club, 3; Secretary, 

2. Birmingham, Ala. 

MAIGEORGE FOSTER — Alpha Delta Pi — History — V. \V. 
C. A.. 1, 2, 3; Y. \V. A., 1, 2, 3; Booklovers, 2, 3. 
Birmingham. Ala. 

Grady Fcllerton, Jr. — Economics — Alpha Phi Ome- 
ga ; Glee Club. Birmingham, Ala. 

Frances Galbreath— Mathematics — Assistant Edi- 
tor, Bull Pup: Vice-President, Freshman Commis- 
sion, 1; Crimson Staff, 1, 2, 3; Y. T. C, 1, 2, 3 ; 
Booklovers. 2; Y. \V. C. A. Cabinet. 2. 3: Y. W. 
C. A., 1, 2, 3; W. A. A., 1, 2, 3; Vice-President 
Y. T. C, 2. Birmingham, Ala 

Earl Gartman — Sociology — H-Club; Football, 1, 2, 
3: Basketball, 1, 2, 3 Birmingham, Ala. 

Ann Gatlin — Social Science — V. W. A., 1, 2, 3: 
Y. W. C. A., 1. 2, 3; Booklovers, 1; Secretary, 
Sophomore and Junior Classes ; Band Sponsor, 1 ; 
Beauty Parade, 1, 2, 3. Hartselle, Ala. 
Vivian Gibus — Chemistry — Marshall, 1, 2; Chi Al- 
pha Sigma, 1, 2, 3; Alpha Epsilon Delta, 2, 3; Tri- 
dent; Vice-President A. E. D., 3; President Chi 
Alpha Sigma, 3. Birmingham, Ala. 
Martha Lor Gober — Beta Sigma Omicron — English 
— V. W. C. A., 1, 2, 3; V. W. A.; Vice-President 
B. S. A.; Booklovers. 1. 2, 3. Birmingham, Ala. 
Doris Godwin — Biology — Alpha Epsilon Delta; 
Treasurer, Booklovers, 2; Vice-President. 3; Glee 
Club. 1, 2, 3; Vice-President Glee Club, 2; A Ca- 
pella Choir, 2, 3; V. W. C. A., 1, 2, 3; W. A. A., 
1, 2, 3; Student Senate, 3; Scholarship Day, 1, 2. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



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Cari. Green — Religious Education — Ministerial Asso- 
ciation, 1, 2, 3 B. S. U. Council, 3. Decatur, Ala. 
Carev Gwin — Pi Kappa Phi — Biology — Vice-Presi- 
dent, Sophomore Class: Men's Pan-Hellenic, 2; Stu- 
dent Publications Board. 3 ; Alpha Epsilon Delta ; 
Chi Alpha Sigma. Sumiton, Ala. 
Horace Hagood — Economics. Pinson, Ala. 
Helen Hinkle — English. Birmingham, Ala. 
Davis Ingram — Chemistry — Chi Alpha 
Leeds, Ala. 

Kimball Johnson, Jr. — Sigma Xu — English- 
terial Association 
Springs, Ala. 
Howard Kirklani> 
ham, Ala. 

Vivian Langley — Religious Education — Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet, 2; Music Chairman, 3; B. S. U. Council, 
2, 3 ; Vice-President Dormitory Council, 3. Camp 
Hill. Ala. 

Dan Lawrence — Economics. Leeds, Alabama. 
Kimsev Lawrence — Sigma Xu — Pharmacy — Foot- 
ball, 1. 2; Basketball, 1; Kappa Psi. Selma, Ala. 
Kleob Lucas — Pharmacy — Entre Nous Staff, 3; 
Kappa Psi ; Kappa Pi : Vice- President. Kappa Pi. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

William Mabrv LuncEEORD — English — Vice-Presi- 
dent Ministerial Association. Lanett, Ala. 
Howard McClain — Lambda Chi Alpha — Pharmacy — 
Band, 1. 2 Orchestra. Gadsden. Ala. 
Pail McCullOUGH — Economics. Birmingham, Ala. 
Frances A. McDaniel— Delta Zeta — V. W. C. A.; 
Booklovers: Beauty Parade; Phi Mu. Birmingham, 
Alabama. 

JOSEPH McDonald, Jr. — Economics — Manager. Bas- 
ketball Team, 1 Manager Football Team, 1, 2. 3; 
H-Club. 2. Birmingham, Ala. 

Kitty Mc I. \ tosh— Alpha Delta Pi — English — Beauty 
Parade. Birmingham, Ala. 
Jim McXamee. Fairfield, Ala. 

Harold L. Malone — Religion — Ministerial Associa- 
tion. Atmore, Ala. 

Prances Mitchell — History. Birmingham. Ala. 
Robert Mize — Lambda Chi Alpha — Chemistry — Chi 
Alpha Sigma: Alpha Epsilon Delta. Birmingham, 
Alabama. 

James Monroe — Religious Education. Ministerial 
Association, Birmingham. Ala. 

Julius Mooney — Economics. Calera, Ma. 
L. C. Mullins, Jr.— History— Y. M. C. A.; Treas- 
urer, Kappa Phi Kappa. 3. Helena. Via. 
I. ins Murphree — Phi Mu English — Vice-President 
Phi Mu. 3; V. W. C. A. ; Vice-President, Sopho 
more Class : Art Club. 1. 2: Weslej Foundation. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

Charles NlAGER — Economii s - International Rela 
tions Club; Assistant Sports Editor Entre Nous. 
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PhOEBE Pierce — English — Y. W. C. A.; Booklovers ; 
Beauty Parade, 1. Birmingham. Ala. 

Milton H. Pope — English — Glee Club ; A Capella 
Choir; Ministerial Association. Birmingham, Ala. 

Bettye Prince — Delta Zeta — Economics — Y. \Y. 
C. A.; Glee Club: A Capella Choir; Corresponding 
Secretary, Delta Zeta. Birmingham. Ala. 

Wili'ord Provo — Religious Education — B. S. U. Coun- 
cil ; Y. M. C. A.: Ministerial Association; Interna- 
tional Relations Club. Birmingham. Ala. 

Hugh Qlin — Lambda Chi Alpha — Journalism; 
Track, 2, 3; Crimson Staff. Birmingham, Ala. 

Evelyn Rhodes — French — Beta Pi Theta ; Glee 
Club. Birmingham, Ala. 

Harold Rhodes — Religion — Ministerial Association ; 
Y. M. C. A.: Mission Band. DeArmanville, Ala. 

James E. Rickey — Sigma Xu — Economics — Glee 
Club; Y. M. C. A. Brown Station. Ala. 

John Blair Richardson — Economics. Cortelyou, 
Alabama. 

Joe Barnett Rutland — Sigma Xu — History — Glee 
Club; Y. M. C. A.; Masquers, 2: Ministerial Asso- 
ciation. Montgomery, Ala. 

Joyce Saks — History. Birmingham, Ala. 

J a m es Shar m a n — Sigma Xu — Biology — President 
Junior Class; Vice- 1'resident 1 1 -Club : Treasurer 
V. M. C. A.; Football, 1, 2, 3. Roanoke. Ala. 

BlLLY A. SMITH — Chemistry — Chi Alpha Sigma, 2, 
3; Secretary, 3; Chemistry Laboratory Assistant, 
1, 2, 3; Student Affiliate of the American Chemical 
Society. Birmingham, Ala. 

Bob Stewart — Pharmacy — Kappi Psi. Birmingham, 
Ala. 

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Helen Strickland — Phi Mu — Biology — Secretary 
Phi Mu. 3: Booklovers, 1, 2; Alpha Epsilon Delta; 
Y. W. C. A. Birmingham, Ala. 

Myrtice Thomason — Economics — W. A. A.; Glee 
Club; A Cappella Choir; Y. W. C. A.; Crimson 
Staff, 3. Tarrant City, Ala. 

Carolyn Thorntox — Delta Zeta — Dietetics — Uni- 
versity of Alabama, 1 ; Vice-President Delta Zeta, 
3: Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, 3; Dietetics Club, 2. 3; 
Vice-President Women's Pan-Hellenic, 3. Birming- 
ham, Ala. 

John Tinki.epaugh — Pi Kappa Alpha — Pharmacy. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

Carroll Trotter, Jr. — English — Masquers — Minis- 
terial Association. Birmingham, Ala. 

Mildred Yann — Economics. Birmingham, Ala. 

Anderson Vaughan — History — Football, 1, 2, Al- 
toona, Ala. 

Vance Vernox — English — Head Cheerleader. 3: 
President Birmingham B. S. L T . Council : Ministerial 
Association; Y. M. C. A. Alexander City, Ala. 

CURTIS J. WaldEN — Sigma Xu — Economics — Men's 
Pan-Hellenic. Birmingham, Ala. 

James Wade — Lambda Chi Alpha — Economics — 
Business Manager Crimson ; Business Manager, Bull 
Pup, 1 ; Art Club. Tarrant City. Ala. 

Harvey Ward — Sigma Xu — Economics — Lt. Com- 
mander, Sigma Xu, E. Oakman, Ala. 

Lavinia Wari>— Phi Mu— English— Y. W. C. A. 

Birmingham, Ala. 

Anna WarmouTH — Beta Sigma Omicron — Biology. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

DUDLEY WaTKINS — History — Business Manager Crim- 
son. Birmingham, Ala. 

Carl F. Whirley — English — Ministerial Association; 
Vice-President Glee Club. 2. 3: Y. M. C. A; A Ca- 
pella Choir, 2, 3. Bagdad, Fla. 
Seymour Wilkes — Sigma Xu — English — Secretarj . 
Glee Club; Vice-President Masquers; Commander 
Sigma Xu ; Student Senate: May Day Honor Court; 
Crimson Staff Business Editor Entre Nous; Ushers 
Club. Montgomery, Ala. 

Bruce B. Wilson— Pi Kappa Phi Aeronautics 
Glee Club; A Capella Choir. Birmingham, Ala. 
WOODROW Wilson — History — Y. M. C. A.; Minis 
terial Association; Glee Club; A Capella Choir; 
Mission Band. Samson. Ala. 

Barbara Woods — Economics — W. \ A . Glee Club, 
1. 2. 3; A Capella Choir, 2. 3. Birmingham. Ala 
l.vn\ Frances Wynne — English Beaut) Parade. 
Samson, Ala. 
Bui y Zi her — Economics. New Merkle, Ala 



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SOPHOMORES 



Ki in Allen— Delta Zeta — English — Glee Club, 1. _' ; 
Booklovers Club, 1. _': Y.W.C. \ 1. _'. Birming- 
ham, Ala. 

Cecelia Anderson- Delta Zeta History Y. \\. C. 

A. 1. 2: \Y. A \.. 1. .'; Y. \\ . V. 1. Birmingham, 
Ala. 

Philip August — Pharmacy. Birmingham, Ala. 

Kelly Baker Economics — Football, 1. 2. Hunts- 

ville. Ala. 

Nelson Ball — Mathematics — Football, 1.2. Chipley, 
Florida. 

Harolu I.. Barnes — Economics — Library Staff, 1. 2. 
Montgomery, Ala. 

M. Derrell Barnett — I'i Kappa Phi Pharmacy. 

Birmingham. Ala. 

Raymond BeardEN — Lambda Chi Alpha — Chem. 
Engin. Birmingham, Ala. 

Alon BEE — Pi Kappa Alpha — English — Alpha Phi 
Omega, 1, 2: Sec. Pi Kappa Alpha, 1: Vice-President 
Pi Kappa Alpha. 2; Crimson Staff. 1. Birmingham, 
Ala. 

Martha Bkrrv — Alpha Delta Pi — English. Birming- 
ham, Ala. 

Warren Bkst — Economics — Football, 1. 2. Jasper. 
Alabama. 

Fkaxk T. Branch — Pi Kappa Phi. Atlanta. Ga. 

Bob Cannon — Lambda Chi Alpha — Business .Itliniiii- 
stration — Track Team. 2: Vice-President Lambda 
Chi Alpha. 2. Birmingham, Ala. 

Jack Carter — Mathematics — Football, 1, 2. Nana- 
lalia, Ala. 

( )scar Causey — Sigma No — Economics — Reporter. 

Sigma Nu. 1, 2: Ushers Club. 1, 2: Y. M. C. A.. 1. 2. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

John Christopher — Mat lie mo tics — Football 1. 2; 
Student Senate. 2. Butler, Ala. 

Mary Elizabeth Clapper— Beta Sigma Omicron 

liiif/lish — Secretary. Beta Sigma Omicron. 2; Y. W. 
C.A., 1. 2; Booklovers, 2: \\ '. A. A.. 1, 2; Crimson 
Staff, 2. Birmingham. .Ma. 

Herman VV. Cobb — Religious Education — Ministerial 
Association, 1. 2: Glee Club. 1. 2. Blountsville, Ala. 

Jam. Cook — English — Y. W.C. A., 1. 2. Birmingham, 
Alabama. 

Carl Cooper— Biology— Y. M. C. A. 1,2; Y. M. C. A.. 
Cabinet. 2; Football, 1, 2. Clanton, Ala. 

Sam Cooper— Biology Y. M. C. A.. 1 .2; Wesley 
Foundation Council. 2: Bull Pup Staff, 2; Football, 

1. Birmingham. Ala. 

Jimmy Countryman — Economics. Birmingham, Ala. 



| 60 



Sarah Margaret Counts — Economics — Y. W.A., 1. 
2. Birmingham, Ala. 

\\\\ Margarei Cowden Beta Sigma Omit: 
Economics— Y. W.C A., 1. 2; Book Lovers Club. 
I. 2: Honor Roll. 1 ; Scholarship Day. 1; Glee Club. 
1: Musical Ensemble, 1. Tarrant. Ala. 

Inez Cruce — Delta /eta English — Y.W.C.A., 1. 2: 
N W A.. 1. Adamsville, Ala. 



Frank Cueearo — History Football, 1. 
Grove, West Virginia. 



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Austin Dean — Lambda Chi Alpha — Biology — Foot- 
ball. 1.2. 1 [anceville, Alabama. 

Alvin Denham— Pi Kappa Alpha — English — Foot- 
ball, L 2; Basketball, 1. 2: Y.M.C.A.. 2. Alexander 
City. Ala. 

John Dodd — History — Ministerial Association, 1. 2. 

Entre Nous Stan, 2: B. S. U. Council. 2; Alpha 
Phi Omega. 2. Semmes, Ala. 

Frank WorlEy Donaldson — Lambda Chi Omega— 
Economics. Birmingham, Ala. 

Deric Edgar— Lambda Chi Alpha — CAfmufry— Bas- 
ketball, 1.2: Alpha Phi Omega. Birmingham. Ala. 

Abe Epsman — Economics Basketball. 1, 2. Birming- 
ham, Ala. 

Morris ETH RIDGE — Sigma Nu — History. Birmingham. 
Alabama. 

Mary K. Finley — Pre - Medicine Vice President, 
Freshman Commission, Y.W.C A. Cabinet. 2: Y.W. 
C. A. 1; Booklovers Club. 2: W. A. A., 1. 2; Crim- 
son Staff. 2. Secretary, Wesley Foundation, 2. 
Homewood, Ala. 

Ruth Fitzpatrick Ea?HO»wiV.r— Birmingham, Ala. 



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SOPHOMORES 



Sarah Florence— Alpha Delta I'i — Journalism — 
Y W. C. A.. 1. 2; Glee Club, 2. Homewood, Ala. 

John Ford — Lambda Chi Alpha — Mathematics, Lag 
land. Ala. 

NELLIE Friel — Chemistry — Chi .\lplia Sigma, 1. 2: 
Reporter, Chi Alpha Si'jma. 2: V. W. C. A. 1. _' : 
\Y. A. A.. 1. _': Honor's Day. 1; Booklovers Club, 2. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

I. ]■".. Cam mil i. — Lambda Chi llpha Pharmacy — 
V. M. C.A., 2. Birmingham, Ala. 

Carolyn Garrick — Sociology — V. W. A., 1.2: Y. W. 
C.A., 1. 2: Baptist Student Council. 2; Dormitory 
Council. 2 ; Women Christian Volunteers, 2 ; W. A. V 
1. 2. Thomasville, Ala. 

Carolyn Gates — Journalism — Y. W. C. A.. 1, 2; 
President. Freshman Commission, 1 : Y. \Y. C A.. 
Cabinet, 2; \Y. A. A . 2: Booklovers Club, 1. 2; 
"H" Day Court, 1. Birmingham, Ala. 

Wendell Givens — Journalism — Y. M. C A. Cabinet, 
2; Sports Editor, Crimson. 2: Sports Editor, Entre 
Nous, 2: Student Library Committee, 2: Editor, 
Bull Pup. 2: Pi Kappa Theta. 2. Montgomery, Ala 

Maky P. Glover — Beta Sigma Omicron — English — 
W.A.A.. 1. 2: Y.W.C.A, 1. 2; H.S.I*. Council. 
2; "H" Day Court. 1 Birmingham, Ala 

Jimmy GoODLETT — Pi Kappa Alpha — Business Ad- 
ministration Red Level. Ala. 

EUGENE GORDON — Chemistry. Oneonta. Ala. 

DELOUISE GranadE — Phi Mu — Sociology — Leant v. 
Entre Nous. 1; Y.W.C.A., 1, 2; Y. W. A., 1. 2. 
Frankville, Ala. 

Maky Virginia GREGORY — Phi Mu — History — Hook- 
lovers Club, 1, 2; Y.W.C.A., 1. 2. Birmingham, 
Alabama. 

Norman Hamm — English. Hayden, Ala. 

Stanley I). Hand — Pi Kappa Alpha — Biology — Sec- 
retary, Pi Kappa Alpha, 2. Birmingham, Ala. 

Clarence L. Hawkins. Jr. — Religion — Ministerial 
Association, 1, 2. Gadsden, Ala. 

Mary FRANCES Hays — Delta Zeta. Birmingham, Ala. 

CHARLES HenCKELL— Y. M. C. A.. 1, 2. Birmingham. 
Alabama. 

John HiGdon — Religious Education — Mars-Hill Col- 
lege, 1 ; Ministerial Association, 2. McKenzie, Ala. 

Milton Hodges- -Pi Kappa Alpha — Economics — Foot- 
ball, 1. 2. Powderly, Ala. 

James H. Hollby, Jr.— History— Y. M. C. A., 1. 2: 

Vice-President, Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. 2: Ministerial 
Association, 1. 2 Birmingham, Ala. 

David S. HomAN— Re ligion— -Y. M. C. A., 1. 2: Min- 
isterial Association, 1. 2 Birmingham. Ala. 



Sara Howell Delta Zeta— Biology— Y. W. C. A., 1. 
2: Y.W.C.A.. Cabinet, 2: Booklovers Club. 1. 2; 
Vice President, Weslej Foundation, 2. Crimson 
Staif, 2: Entre Nous Staff, 1. Birmingham, Ala. 

Mary Virginia Hull— Beta Sigma Omicron — Chem- 
istry. Birmingham, Via 

J. X. Hurtt — Mathematics — Alpha Phi Omega, 2; 
Theta Tri Beta, 2. lrond.de. Ala 

Os< \i< LEE Hi kit. Jr. — Chemistry — Chi Alpha Sim- 
ma. 1. 2: Alpha Phi Omega. 2: Boy's Che Club. 2. 
(rondale, Ala. 

Terrell Warren Huw hinson — Economics — B. S. U. 

Council. 1: Lull Pup Staff. 2: Y. M.C A.. 1. 2: 
Ushers Club. 2. Enterprise, Ala. 

Betty Johnson— Y.W.C.A., 1. 2: Booklovers Club, 
1. 2; W.A.A., 1. 2. Birmingham, Ala. 

Martha [ohnson — Phi Mu — English — Y. W.C. A.. 

1, 2; Y. W. A.. 1. 2. Oxford. Ala. 

MURRELL W. Johnson — Journalism — Sports Pub- 
licity Director. 1. 2: Track Team, 1, 2; Crimson 
Staff, 1, 2. Birmingham, Ala. 

Ralph Johnson — Economics — B. S. U. Council. 2: 
Y. M.C. A. Cabinet. 2; Alpha Phi Omega. 1. 2. Fort 
Payne, Ala. 

Kathryn Jones — History — Y. W. C. A., 1. 2; Die- 
tetics Club. 1, 2: Birmingham, Ala. 

William Moye King — Economics. Cullman, Ala. 

Paul Kluce — Religion — Track. 1. 2. Birmingham, 
Alabama. 

JOE BILL KNOWLES — History -Ministerial Associa- 
tion. 2. Headland. Ala. 

WiLFORD Lank — Accounting. Clanton, Ala. 



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I 62 | 





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SOPHOMORES 



Barnard LanglEY — Religion. Fort Payne, Ala. 
1 In. ii I.iu.Y. \cmar, Ala. 

Virgin] \ Lipscomb — Delta Zeta — English — Y. \\ '. C. 
A.. 1. _'; Booklovers Club, 1. 2; Y.W.A., 1. -'. 
Scottsboro, Ala. 

W. A. Lockler — Religion, Eden, Ala. 

S\m Lofton — Pi Kappa Phi — Pharmacy. Hartford, 
Alabama. 

Kkvk Mark hk — Medicine — Glee Club, 1. 2: W.A 
A.. 1. 2; A. Cappella Choir. 1. 2; Y.W.C.A., 1. 2: 
Crimson Staff, 2; Alpha Epsilon Delta. 2: Chi Delta 
Phi. 2: President. Booklovers Club. 2; Vice-Presi- 
dent, W. A. A.. 2. Jacksonville, Fla. 

\*kmk Lee Martin — Beta Sigma Omicron — Physical 
Education— Y.W. A., 1, 2; Y. W. C. A., 1, 2. Truss- 
ville, Ala. 

Jam: MATHEWS — Beta Sigma ( )micron— English — 
Y. W.C.A., 1, 2; Booklovers Club, 1. 2. Birming- 
ham. Ala. 

Bob McCallEY — Sigma Nu. Birmingham, Ala. 

HUGH McCLUSKY — Pharmacy. Birmingham. Ala. 

Elizabeth McCool — Pharmacy — Y. W. C. A., 1, 2: 

W. \ A.. 1. 2; Booklovers, 1. 2: F.ntre Nous Staff, 
2. Fairfield, Ala. 

Miriam McCullough — Spanish — Y. W. C. A., 1. 2. 

Birmingham. Ala. 

Charles McDonald — Sigma Nu — Economics. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 

Charles McEachern — Pi Kappa Alpha — Economics 
—President P. K. A. 4; Y. M. C. A.. 1, 2: Mens 
Pan-Hellenic. 2. Birmingham. Ala. 

Crayton McEachern — Economics — President. Fresh- 
man Class. Lanett, Ala. 

Annette McLeod — Religion — W. C. V., 1. 2: \Y. \ 
A., 1, 2; Y.W.A., 1. 2: Y.W. C.A., 1. 2: Mobile. 
Alabama. 

Sara McNeill— English— Y. W. C. A.. 1, 2; Book- 
lovers Club. 1. 2; W. A. A.. 1. 2; Crimson Staff, 2. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Donald NU Rae — History- 

Alabama. 



-Y. M. C. A.. 



Mobile, 



Anita Meadow s— Delta Zeta— Dietetics— Y. W. C. A.. 
1: Y.W. A., 1. 2: Dietetics Club, 1. 2. Birmingham. 
Alabama. 

Edna Jo Medlin — Alpha Delta Pi Mathematics 
Y.W.C. A., 1; C.lcc Club, 1. Birmingham. Ala. 

Virginia Mehaffey — Phi Mu — Sociology — Olee Club. 
1, 2; A Cappella Choir. 1. 2; Booklovers Club. 2; 
Y. W. C. A . 1. 2. Birmingham. Ala. 



ill 



Margaret Lee Monroe — Phi Mu — History — Cheer- 
leader, 2; Y. VV. C. A.. 1. 2. Birmingham. Ala. 

Ja< k Moore — Economics — Y. M. C V. 1, 2. Tarrant 

City. Ala. 

Jane Murphy— Delta /eta — Economics — Y. W. C. V. 

1, 2: Booklovers Club. 1. 2; Bullpup Staff. 2. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 

Mary Sn Yhki.y — Delta Zeta — Sociology — Y. W. 
C. A.. 1. 2: Glee Club, 1. 2; Y. W. A.. 2. Trussville, 

Alabama. 

Bobbie Nichols — Beta Sigma Omicron — English — 

Y. W. C. A.. 1, 2; W. A. A.. 1. 2: Booklo\er> Club, 
1. 2; Kappa Pi. 2: Art Club, 1. Birmingham, Ala. 

KATHLYN Parson — Pharmacy — Y. VV. C. A., 1, 2; 

Y. W. A.. 1. Halcyville. Ala. 

Franklin Parker — Economics. LaFayette, Ala. 

Pat Patton — Economics. Ida. Ala. 

Sarah Peeples — History — Y. VV. C. A.. 1. 2; Glee 
Club, 2. Birmingham. Ala. 

James Howard Peterson— English — Ministerial As- 
sociation, 2: Y. M. C. A.. 1. 2. Dothan, Ala. 

John Pittman — Economics — Student Senator, 2; 
Treasurer FYeshman Class Birmingham, Ala. 

William Gayle Posey. Birmingham. Ala. 

Franklin RandlE — Mathematics. Pinson, Ala. 

HUBERT Ray — Religion — Ministerial Association. 1. 
2: Y. M. C. A.. 1. 2; Chaplain. Y. M. C. A.. 2. 
Gordo, Ala. 



"Doc" Wesson 



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Lilly 

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LOCKLER 

Lofton 



Markee 
Martin- 
Mathews 
McCalley 
McClusky 



McCool 

McCfLLOUGH 

McDonald 
Chas. McEachern 
C. McEachern 



McLeod 
McNeill 
McRae 
Meadows 
Medlin 



Mehaffey 
Monroe 
Moore 
Mirphy 
Neely 



Nil HOLS 

Parson- 
Parker 
Patton 
Peeples 



Peterson 
Pittman 

Posey 
R win i 
Ray 



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5L SOPHOMORES 



Hugh Reynolds Sigma Nu — Pharmacy Union, Mis 
souri. 

Margis Robinson Chemistry. Birmingham, Ala 

Orvh.i.k RuTLEDGE — Pi Kappa Alpha — Pre-Law. 
Haleyville, Ala. 



MABEL SaEEI.Es — History — V". w. C. A.. 1. 
Club, 1. 2. Birmingham, Ala. 



Glee 



James Shewmake — Mississippi College, 1; Minis- 
terial Association, 1. 2. Birmingham, Ala. 

Roy Simmons — Pi Kappa Alpha — Chemistry — Entre 
Nous Staff, 2. Columbiana, Ala. 

Hi i.i. Solley — Mathematics — President, Sophomore 
Class, 2; Football, 1. 2; Basketball, 1. Guntersville, 
Alabama. 

Billy Stephenson — Religion — Ministerial Associa- 
tion. 1,2; V. M. C. A.. 1, 2; Football, 1. Hartselle. 
Alabama. 

Martha Sue Stokes — Biology — Y. W. C. A., 1. 2; 
Y. W. A.. 1, 2; Crimson Staff, 1, 2; Glee Club. 1, 2. 
Gadsden, Ala. 

Frank Story — Pi Kappa Phi — Pharmacy. Gadsden, 
Alabama. 

Sara Srco — Spanish — V. W. C. A., 1, 2: Booklovers 

Club, 1. _'; W. A. A.. 1. 2: Marshal, 1 ; Honors Day. 
1 ; Entre Nous Stall, 2; B. S. U. Council. 2; Y. W. 
C. A. Council, 2; Glee Club, 2; Crimson Staff. 2. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

GEORGE SWOPE — Ministerial Association, 1, 2. Bes- 
semer, Ala. 

W. GERALD Tiduell — English — Ministerial Associa- 
tion, 2 Y. M. C. A.. 1. 2. Montgomery. Ala. 

John J. Townsend — Biology — Football, 1. 2. Hart- 
selle, Ala. 

Wilton W. Vaughn — Pi Kappa Alpha — Mathematics 

Orchestra, 2. Birmingham. Ala. 

JEANETTE WADE — Y. W. A. A.. 1. 2; Mission Band, 
2. Birmingham, Ala. 

Margaret Ward — Alpha Delta Pi — English — Glee 
Club, 1. 2; A Cappella Choir, 2; Y. W. C. A.. Cabi- 
net, 2; Y. W. C. A.. 1, 2. Birmingham, Ala. 

James H. Warren — Pharmacy. Knterprise, Ala. 



Mildred Wasson Delta Zeta — Sociology — Y. W. 
C. A.. 1. 2; Glee Club. 1. 2. Birmingham, Ala. 

Dorothy Elaine Weathers — English. Birmingham, 
Alabama. 

[ii> Stevens Wesson, Jr.- Economics — Y. M. C. A. 
1. 2; Tract. 1. 2: Glee Club. 2; Basketball, 2. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 

Jean West — Mathematics — Birmingham - Southern 
College, 1; Y. W. C. A.. 2. Birmingham, Ala. 

Ernest Wheeler — Religion — Y. M. C. A . 2; Minis 
terial Association, 2. Five Points. Ala. 

John Harvey Wiley — History. Birmingham, Ala. 
Horace Williams— Pi Kappa Phi — Pharmacy. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 

Sara Williams — Economics — Y. W. A. Council, 2: 
Y. W. C. A.. 1. 2; Booklovers Club. 1; Glee Club. 
1. 2. Thomasville, Ala. 

Edythe Winsper — Economics — Y. W. C. A. 2: 
Secretary-Treasurer, Presbyterian, 2: Entre Nous 

Staff. 2. Fairfield, Ala. 

Philip Winters — Biology — Football, 1. 2. McWil- 
iiams, Ala. 

ROBERT WOODY, History — Ministerial Association. 1, 
2: Y. T. C. 1; Y. M.C. A.. 1, 2. Pa Fayette, Via. 

Cathryne Deloris Word Social Science — B. S. CJ. 
Council. 2; Dietetics Club. 1; Beta Omicron. 1: 
President W. C. Y.. 2; Y. W. C. A.. 1. 2; Y. W. A.. 
Cabinet, 1, 2 Shawmut, Ala 



Sarah SUGG 



[ 66 ] 















Reynolds 




i J!*L. 'fl 


Robinson 






Rutledge 

Saffi.ks 
Shewmake 



k- Jl 



Simmons 

SOLI.EY 

Stephenson 

Stokes 
Story 



Sugg 
SwopE 

T I DWELL 

Townsend 
Vaughn 



Wade 

Ward 
Warren 
Wasson 

What hers 



Wesson 
West 
Wheeler 
Wiley 
II. Williams 



S. Williams 

WlNSPl K 

Winters 

Woody 
Word 



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Alexander 
Anderson 

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B IGGETT 
I! ITSON 

IllMRI) 

BEASLE1 



E Bennett 
M. Bennett 
Bentley 
Bl vck 
Blake 



Boi i\ 
Bonourant 
Branch 
M. Brock 
T. Brock 



Brooks 
C. Brown 
J. Browv 
W. Brown 
Bryant 



P.! 1 B WAN 

BURG! SS 

Burleson 

RtRNH AM 
BURNETT 



Byro 
Cargo 
Cars 

PRK HARD 
CH \ I'M AN 




[ 68 ] 



Z)L FRESHMEN 



Eli Adkinson — Religion — Ministerial Association. 
Bluff Springs, Fla. 

Lamar Akin — ■Sigma Nu — Economics. Bessemer, 

Alabama. 

Clara Bellk Alexander — Business Administration — 
Y. W. A. Pell City, Ala. 

Martha Anderson — Beta Sigma Omicron — Dietetics. 
Glencoe, Ala. 

Anita Attaway — Chemistry — Y. W. A.: Y. \V. C. A. 
Warrior, Ala. 

JlMMY AUSTON — l'i Kappa Alpha. Birmingham, Ala. 

Hudson Bacgett — History — Basketball 1. Arkadel- 
phia, Ala. 

D. W. Batson — Lambda Chi Alpha — Pharmacy. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

William Beaird — Economics. Birmingham, Ala. 

Margaret Beasi.ky — Y. \Y. C. A. Birmingham, Ala. 

Edna Jam: Bennett — Phi Mu — English — Entre Nous 

Staff 1; Crimson Staff 1. Dormitory Council; 
Y. \Y. C. A. Heflin, Ala. 

Mildred Bexxett — Sociology. Birmingham, Ala. 



Martha 1 1 agood 




Stanley Bextley — Pi Kappa Alpha — Pre-Medicine. 
Nostalgio, Ala. 

Betty Black — English — Y. W. C. A. Birmingham. 
Alabama. 

Stewart Blake — English — Y. W. C. A. Birming- 
ham, Ala. 

Pent Bolin — History — Football 1. Sulligent, Ala. 

Mason BonduranT — Religion — Ministerial Associa- 
tion ; Glee Club 1. Fairfield, Ala. 

Frank Branch — l'i Kappa Phi. Atlanta, Ga. 

Mari.exe Brock— Dietetics— Y. \Y. A.; Y. W. C. A. 
Boaz, Ala. 

Thomas Brock — Religion — Ministerial Association. 
Eufaula, Ala. 

Winnie P. Brooks — Economics. Ider, Ala. 

Constance Brow x — Beta Sigma Omicron — Dietetics. 
Eudora, Arkansas. 

Joyce Brown — Y. W. C. A. Dothan, Ala. 

W ix eked Brown — Pharmacy. Ariton, Ala. 

Kenneth Bryant — Economics — Football 1. Scotts- 
boro, Ala. 

Jean Buchanan — Alpha Delta Pi — English. Bir- 
mingham. Ala, 

Hekshel Burgess — Pharmacy. Holly Pond. Ala. 

JEANETTE Buri.ESON — Alpha Delta Pi. Gadsden, Ala. 

K ath eri me Burn ham — Journalism — Crimson Stat t 
1 ; Dream Girl of Pi Kappa Alpha, Houston. Texas 

MACON BURNETT — Biology. Birmingham, Ala. 

Herbert Byrd l'i Kappa Alpha. Birmingham, Ala. 

Sam Cargo. Tarrant City, Ala. 

John Carr History. Birmingham, Ala. 

i',n i'\si.\ — Religion — GKe Club 1; A Cappclla 
Choir 1 Gadsden, Ala. 

Kii\ Chapman — Economics. Orlando, Fla. 



I 69 | 



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Charles 
J. Chisolm 
S. Chisoi \i 
Cli \i mkk 

E. COCHR ^N 



P. Cochran 
W. Cochran 
Coli 
Collins 
Cook 



Coshatt 

Craw FORD 
Crow 
Crow i>i:r 
culbreath 



Cunningham 
Dabney 

I).\\ [DSON 

A. Davis 
B. Davis 



Denly 

Dickinson 
Duke 
Eddleman 
Ellis 



Kntu isti.k 
Epperson 
Ferguson 
Ford 
D. Franklin 



R. Franklin 
Franks 
Frier son 

('.HI. II. AND 

Golden 




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I 70 I 



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FRESHMEN 



Hakky Charles, Jr. — P re-Medicine. Birmingham, 
Ala. 

Jack Chisolm — Lambda Chi Alpha — Chemistry — 
Cheerleader 1. Birmingham, Ala. 

Sara Chisolm — Phi Mu. Birmingham. Ala. 

Carolyn ClEmmer — Alpha Delta Pi — English — 
Y. \Y. C A.; Glee Club 1. Birmingham, Ala. 

Erma Lor Cochran — History. Nauvoo, Ala. 

Pauline Cochran — English — Y. W. C. A. Centre. 
Alabama. 

Walter Cochran — Pi Kappa Phi — Collinsville, Ala. 

JERRY Cole — Pi Kappa Alpha — Economics — Alpha 

Phi Omega. Birmingham, Ala. 

Tom L. Collins — Lambda Chi Alpha — Pharmacy. 
Leeds, Ala. 

Gene Cook — Chemistry. Sylacauga, Ala. 

Esta Belle Coshatt — English. Trussville, Ala. 

J. W. Crawford — Religion — Ministerial Association. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

CE( ii. F. Crow — Religion — Ministerial Association. 
Townley, Ala. 

William W. Crowder — Religion. Bessemer, Ala. 



\\ 1 1,1 oki) Lane 



II 5 



ill 




Ray ward Bill Culbreath — Religion. Columbia, Ala. 

Donald Cunningham — History. Carbon Hill, Ala. 

Helen Dabney — History. Birmingham, Ala. 

Douglas Davidson — Relit/ion — Y. M. C. A., Glee 
Club 1. Luverne, Ala. 

Arthur Davis — Mathematics — Entre Nous Staff 1. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

Betty Davis — Alpha Delta Pi. Birmingham, Ala. 

Elaine DEnlEy — Phi Mu — English — Y. \V. C. A. 

Birmingham, Ala. 

Mary Dickinson. Birmingham, Ala. 

Frances Duke — English — Y. W. C. A. Birmingham, 
Alabama. 

Elvia Eddleman — Pi Kappa Phi — Pre-Medicine. 

Birmingham, Ala. 

LOUISE ELLIS — Interior Decorating. Bridgeport, Ala. 

Jimmy Entwistle — Religion — Ministerial Associa- 
tion. Lanett, Ala. 

Carolyn W. Epperson. Birmingham, Ala. 

ShERLEY Ferguson — Football 1. Oakman, Ala. 

Martha Virginia Ford — Y. W. C. A. Birmingham, 

Ala. 

DarlEne Franklin — Phi Mu — Pre-Medicine — Y. \Y. 

C. A. ; Booklovers. Birmingham, Ala. 

Ruby Louise Franklin — Biology — Y. \V. C. A. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

THERESA Franks — Religion — Y. \Y. C. A.; Glee 
Club 1. Birmingham, Ala. 

John FRIERSON — Pi Kappa Phi — Pharmacy. Mt. 
Pleasant, Teiin. 

Mary Gim.ii.and— Y. \Y. (A A. Attalla. Ala. 

Annie l.n; Golden — English — Y. W. C. V Shaw 
mut, Ala. 



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Graham 


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Harpkh 
Hassell 
Hi 1.1. 
HOGAN 

Holland 



Tom Holland 
houlditch 
! In STON 

Hudson 

Jarrett 



Jones 

KlRKI.AND 

Lancaster 

Lee 

Lewis 



LONG 
LOONEY 
LOVEGREN 

B. Lowery 

D. Low mi 



Licks 
Mangum 

M \KTIN 

Mathews 
McCaleb 



B. McDonald 
J. McDonald 
Miller 
Mitchell 
K Morton 




[ n ] 



Vke FRESHMEN 



Roy Goldsmith. Atmore, Ala, 

MargenE Graham — Biology — V. W. C. A., Bessemer, 
Alabama. 

Gracie LEE Gray — V. W. C. A. Birmingham, Ala. 

Katherine Gwin — Delta Zeta — Y. W. C. A. Bes- 
semer, Ala. 

Martha Hagood — Pre-Medicine — Y. \V. C. A. ; 
Y. W. A. Albertville, Ala. 

Mack Harper. Plantersville, Ala. 

William Hassell — Pi Kappa Phi — Pharmacy. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 

Thomas F. Hill — Sigma Nu — History — Publicity 
Director. Birmingham, Ala. 

Roscoe Hogan — Sigma Nu — English. Birmingham, 
Alabama. 

Talmauge Holland — Pi Kappa Alpha — Engineering. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

Tom Holland — Engineering. Fayetteville, Tenn. 

Bette Jane Hoii.ditch — English — Glee Club 1 ; 
Y. W. C. A.; Crimson Staff 1. Birmingham, Ala. 

E. C. HOUSTON — Religion — Ministerial Association. 
Bessemer, Ala. 



Louise Parker 




Lorena Hudson — Blountsville, Ala. 

Doris Jarrett — Beta Sigma Omicron — Dietetics — 
Cheerleader 1. Birmingham, Ala. 

E. N. Jones, Jr. — Economics — Football 1. Valley 
Head, Ala. 

Nona Kirkland — Economics — Y. W. C. A. Enter- 
prise, Ala. 

Virginia Lancaster. Trussville, Ala. 

Edward Lee — Religion. Hazel Green, Ala. 

Alvin Lewis — Homewood, Ala. 

Olive Anne Long — Alpha Delta Pi — Pre-Medicine. 
Jasper, Ala. 

Edgar Looney — Mathematics. Birmingham, Ala. 

Norman Lovegren. Birmingham, Ala. 

Bruce Lowery — Delta Zeta— Y. W. C. A. Thomas- 
ville, Ala. 

Dan Lowery — Chemistry — Laboratory Assistant. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 

Mary Alice Lucius— Phi Mu— Y. \Y. C. A. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 

Mary Mangum— Alpha Delta Pi— Winfield, Ala. 

Fred C. Martin. Birmingham, Ala. 

Jesse Mathews — Wedowee, Ala. 

Willard McCalEb — History. Fayette, Ala. 

Bn.i. McDonald — Chemistry. Birmingham, Ala. 

Jam-; McDonald — Economics — Y, \\ . C. A. Leeds, 

Alabama. 

Glenn M. Miller — Religion — Ministerial Associa- 
tion. I tance\ ille, Ala, 

Charles Mitchell, Jr.— Pi Kappa Alpha — Chemis- 
try. Birmingham, Ala. 

Ernest Morton, Guntersville, Ala. 



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Nj 11.1. 
Nelson 
Nesbitt 
New man 



Parker 
Patrick 
Patterson 
B. Patton 

l. Patton 



F. Pearson 
M. Pearson 
Petrea 

POW ELL 

J. Powers 



K. Powers 
Prichard 

Raw i. in son 
R. Ran 
\V. R u 



Reagan 
Reinhardt 

Riddle 
RedgELL 
Riley 



Ritch 
Ryan 
Saia 

Sanderson 
Sartain 



SCHW EINEBRATEN 
Si HIVLEY 

K. Scott 
S. Scott 

Seals 




I 74 I 



^Jke 



FRESHMEN 



foE Morton — Football 1. Guntersville, Ala. 

Flora Neill. Birmingham, Ala. 

Terrell Nelson. Boaz, Ala. 

W. C. Nksbitt — Economics. Orlando, Fla. 

Elwood Newman- — Chemistry. Fayette, Missouri. 

Louise Parker — Sociology. LaFayette, Ala. 

Sri-. Patrick — Delta Zeta — English. Scottsboro, Ala. 

Martha Patterson'— Phi Mu — Home Economics — 
Y. \V. C. A. Birmingham, Ala. 

Billv PATTON — Biology. Icier, Ala. 

Lionel Pattox — Religion — Y. M. C. A. Ider, Ala. 

Fred Pearson — Pi Kappa Phi — Pre-Dentistry — Glee 
Club 1. Montevallo, Ala. 

Mary Pearson — English — Crimson Staff ; Editor 
Freshman Crimson. Montevallo, Ala. 

Eyra DELLL Petrea — Business Administration. Tal- 
ladega, Ala. 

M. D. Powell — Economics. Tullahoma, Tennessee. 

JERRY POWERS — Delta Zeta; Y ,W. C. A.; Glee Club 
1. Oneonta, Ala. 



Mary PEARSON 




Kenneth Powers. Birmingham, Ala. 

Howard Prichard — Religion — Glee Club 1 ; A Ca- 
pella Choir 1. Gadsden, Ala. 

Vernon Rawlinson — Biology — Glee Club 1; A Ca- 
pella Choir 1. Birmingham, Ala. 

Robert C. Ray— Football 1. Langdale, Ala. 

William J. Ray — Pre-Mcdicinc. Birmingham, Ala. 

Willie Dean Reagan— History— Y. W. C. A. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 

Evelyn M. Reinhardt. Wilsonville, Ala. 

Joe Riddle — Pi Kappa Alpha — Economics — Glee Club; 
A Capella Choir 1. Birmingham, Ala. 

Mary Elizabeth Ridgell — Economics. Birmingham, 
Alabama. 

Hayden Riley — Football 1. Guin, Ala. 

George B. Ritch, Jr. Pell City, Ala. 

Jean Ryan — Economics. Leeds, Ala. 

Carl J. Saia — Lambda Chi Alpha — Pharmacy. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 

Paul Edwin Sanderson. Birmingham, Ala. 

Mary Helen Sartain — Religion — Y. W. C. A. ; 
Glee Club 1. Birmingham, Ala. 

JEWEL SchwEINEBRATEN — Delta Zeta. Birmingham, 

Alabama. 

1). C. Scivley— Football 1. Bnsley, Ala. 

Kathleen Scott — Religion — Glee Club 1. Birming- 
ham, Ala. 

Sarah Scott. Cropwell, Ala. 

HoRTEZ SEALS — Religion — Ministerial Association — 
Y. M. C. \. Bessemer, Ala. 



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Shahj 

Shu BY 

Sherrer 

Si m mons 
Simon row 



SlSSON 

Small wood 

Smith 
Sme m» 

Sl'KKR 



Standifek 
Stephen- 
Sum hers 
Thomas 
Thomason 



Traylor 

Triplett 

VOLKING 

Ward 
Warren 



Wathen 

Weeks 
Weir 

White head 
Whiting 



Whitten 
Win dam 
WOFFORD 

Wood 
Wren 




76 



Vb FRESHMEN 



Mattii.ene Sharbutt. Vincent, Ala. 

Doris ShEI.by — Religion — Y. W. C. A. Birmingham, 
Ala. 

GLENN A Shkrrkr. Birmingham, Ala. 

Kaskei.l Simmons — Uconomics. Haleyville, Ala. 

Bitty SlMONTON— Delta Zcta — Eitijlish — Y. W. C. A. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

Howard Sisson — Pi Kappa Alpha — Football 1. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 

WeymAn R.M-; Smai. i. woon — Football 1, Basketball 1. 
Shawmut, Ala. 

SUE Smith — Beta Sigma Omicron — Art. Birming- 
ham, Ala. 

Rachel SnEAd — Mathematics. Birmingham, Ala. 

Edward V. SpEER — I'i Kappa Phi. Wetumpka, Ala. 

Marik Standifer — Pre-Medicine — Y. W. C. A. 
Gadsden, Ala. 



Daniel Sheph vrd 




Horace Stephens — Pi Kappa Alpha— Art — Y. M. 
C. A. Booneville, Mississippi. 

Harry SUMMERS — Football 1. Birmingham, Ala. 

Ri-th Thomas— History— Y. W. C. A., Y. T. C. 
Scottsboro, Ala. 

Bill Thompson — Economics. Birmingham, Ala. 

Tommy Traylor — Football 1. Wedowee, Ala. 

GEORGE Triplett — Economics. Birmingham, Ala. 

Dixie Volking — -Delta Zeta. Birmingham, Ala. 

F.i \ri'. Ward— Phi Mu— Religion— Y. W. C. A. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

Dolphus K. Warren — Pharmacy. Birmingham, Ala. 

John WathEn — Pre-Medicine. Morganfield, Ken- 
tucky. 

Jim mm; D. Weeks— Football 1, Y. M. C. A. Bir- 
mingham, Ala. 

Ernest Weir. Birmingham, Ala. 

Helen Whitehead — Beta Sigma Omicron — Pre- 
Medicine. Birmingham, Ala. 

Laura Mai: Whiting — English. Birmingham, Ala. 

Mary Jo W ii itten- Delta Zeta. Birmingham, Ala. 

Ben D. Windham — Religion. Dothan, Ala. 

Yi'.kki'.i. WoFPORU — History. Boaz, Ala. 

Jane Claire Wood — Music — Y. W. C. A. Birming- 
ham, Ala. 

(Catherine Wren m— -Alpha Delta Pi. Birmingham, 
Ala. 



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Oh, Howard. Alma Mater true. 

I love thy glorious name, deserving every honor due 

To an unsullied fame. 

I'll love thee through each fleeting breath 

For all that thou has done. 

And in the agonies of death 

Be still thy loving son. 



Oh. Alma Mater, dear, thy life 

A treasure is to me: 

Thou, Phoenix fair, through flames and strife. 

Hast shown thy ri*»ht to be. 

Since poverty has made thee rich 

And struggle made thee strong. 

1 view thee in thy self-made niche. 

And burst to filial song. 



Oh, parent true, the future fair 

Must hold but good for thee. 

For hope's fruition waits thee there 

In blest reality. 

And sons like thine will make thee shine 

With glory all thine own. 

And bring to thy maternal shrine 

Not gifts of gold alone. 

Words by Dr. G. W. Macon. '84 
Music by Professor Paul DeLaunay 



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tJSeliu VDarneS, (L-uelijn f\pinliunll 
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L^eciie (7J>. 




This year, as in years before, the beauties were selected by a cele- 
brity who didn't have the opportunity of seeing anything but the 
pictures of the girls. Mr. DeMille did select the six prettiest pic- 
tures. This year he came nearer to choosing the prettiest K'Hs on 
the campus than a selector has in many years. 

We appreciate, of course, the time and the talent that he gave to 
the selection. He wrote that lie was only too glad of the privilege 
to determine our beauty section. Naturally he expressed his dif- 
ficulty in eliminating such beauties as he didn't select. 

The girls for the "Mure Beauty" section were chosen by Francis 
Falkenburg, manager of the Alabama Theatre; Ernest Henderson, 
artist for the Birmingham News; and Vincent Townsend, city edi- 
tor of the Birmingham News. To them we express our gratitude. 



[ 88 ] 



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GOBEK 
1 lol.eoM B 
MURPHREE 



Norton 
Russell 
Sanders 
Thornton 




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omen 6 r an-^rteaeviic ^ouna 

MEMBERS 



Sue Blanton 

Martha Lor GobER 
MarjoriE 1 lol.COM B 
Lois MurphrEE 



Vivian Norton 
Kitty Russell 
Norma Jeanne Sanders 
Carolyn Thornton 



The purpose of the Women's Pan-Hellenic Council is to foster 
good and friendly relations between the four sororities. The two repre- 
sentatives from each sorority bring the problems of their sorority to 
the meeting of the "Pan", and they are discussed. The girls decide on 
rush rules and the time to have parties, and the besl kind of parties to 
have. 

However the Council hasn't been working as smoothly the last two 
years as usual. Especially is thi> so when it comes to politics. There 
has been a noticeable amount of jealousy between the sororities. Per- 
haps iK-Nt year this can be ironed out and the dames can work smoothly 
together. 

f <»o 1 





en 6 




-^j^reiienLC 

MEMBERS 



Ballard 
Cork 
Deason 
McBraykr 



McEachern 
McLendon 

Richly 
Wade 



^Afeuenic Council 



Henry Ballard 
Robert Cork 
J. M. Deason 

Edwin McBraykr 



Charles McEachErn 
Jack McLendon 
Jimmy Ritchie 
James Wade 



The Men's Pan-Hellenic Council is composed of two representa- 
tives from each of the fraternities that have a chapter on the Howard 
campus. It meets to discuss fraternity life and welfare and to plan 
ways of bettering interfraternity relations. The general aim, however 
decrepit, is to establish a medium whereby the various fraternities may 
meet and solve their individual and collective problems. 

The inevitable historic ill-feeling among the chapters of the Coun- 
cil has not helped any in fostering cooperation concerning betterment of 
intert raternal relations but occasionally they get together on something 
like politics or a ball and really set the world on fire. The annual social 
where all fraternal differences are forgotten was called off after tickets 
had been issued because the Democratic Women's Council wished a girl- 
break and the men for once did not erive in. 



Baker 
Berry 

Hi. a N ION 

Broadwell 



BUCHANON 

Burleson 
Clem mer 
Colley 



I )ABNEY 

Davis 
Florence 
Foster 



Goodrich 

1 I 1XKLK 

Long 
McIntosh 



Mangum 
Medlin 
Norton 
Ridgell 



SCARBROUI.il 

Wallace 
Ward 
Wrenn 




KAPPA CHAPTER 



OFFICERS 

President SuE BlanTox 

( 'ice-President __ Vivian Norton 

Secretary .Frances Goodrich 

Treasurer SELINA BAKER 



MEMBERS 

Selina Baker 
Martha Berry 
Sue Blanton 
.Margaret Broadwell 
Jean Buchanon 

JEAnnETTE Burleson 
Carolyn ClEmmer 
B. G. Colley 
Helen Dabney 
Betty Davis 
Helen Hinkle 
Sarah Florence 
MaigEORGE Foster 
Frances Goodrich 
Edna Jo Medlin 
Vivian Norton 
Evelyn Scarbrough 
Olive Ann Long 
Mary George Mangum 
Kitty McIntosh 
Mary Elizabeth Ridgell 
Edwina Wallace 
Margaret Ward 
[Catherine Wrenn 




Top — Frances Goodrich, Sin- Blanton, Selina 
Baker, Vivian Norton 

Bottom— The A. 1). Pi Lodge 



• • •The Alpha Helta I'i Sorority is composed of 
such pretty girls as Vivian Norton, Edna Jo Medlin, 
Margaret Ward, Selina Baker and Olive Ann Long. 
It would be a matter of almost impossibility to find 
another sorority on this campus which could equal the 
A. D.'s for a combination of beauty and intelligence. 

To bi-gin with there is Sue Blanton, Student Sena- 
tor, past treasurer of the student body and member 
of the (Mcc Club. Some more outstanding personali- 
ties arc Margaret Ward, actress, A plus student in 
French; Edna Jo Medlin, actress and a consistant 
member of the honor roll; Frances Goodrich, presi- 
dent of the Young Women's Christian Association; 
Mar) George Mangum, writer for the Entre Nous; 
and Evelyn Scarbrough, singer and one of the nicest 

j^irls we know. 



The beauty section is well clustered with V D. 
Pi's. Mr. DeMille considered Edna Joe Medlin pretty 
enough for the first six. And in the other section 
you will see the laces of Margaret Ward, Kitty Mc- 
intosh and ( )live Ann Long. 

The girls have been recently working on their house. 
They have had the floor and walls repainted and are 
considering fixing the screens on the windows. 

Although the chapter will lose tour members h> 
graduation who will he hard to replace, still the 
future looks bright with such promising freshmen as 
Olive \nn Long, Marj George Mangum, Betfj 
Davis and lean Kuchanon. 



93 



Anderson 

All AW AY 

I!. Brown 
C. Brow \ 



Clapper 
Cowden 
Cruce 
Epperson 



Glover 
Gober 
Jarrett 
Martin 



Mathews 
Nichols 
Poole 
Saunders 



Smith 
Warmouth 
Weathers 

W'll [TEHEAD 




(/Seta S^)Lama \Ji 



f 



'micron 



BETA BETA CHAPTER 



OFFICERS 



President .. -Norma Jeanne Sanders 

Vice-President Martha Lou GoEber 

Secretary Mary Elizabeth Clapper 

Treasurer BOBBIE NlCHOLS 



MEMBERS 



Bernice Brown- 
Mary Elizabeth Clapper 
Martha Kate Anderson 
Anita Attarway 
Connie Brown 
Carolyn EPPERSON 

Anna Margaret Cowden 

Inez Cruse 

Martha Lor GobER 

Mary Elizabeth Glover 
Lucile Poole 
Doris JarrETT 
Venie Lee Martin 
Jane Mathews 

Bobbie Nichols 
Norma Jeanne Sanders 
Sue Smith 

Dorothy Weathers 
Helen Whitehead 
Anna War moth 




Top — Mary Elizabeth Clapper, Bobbie Nich< 

Norma Jeanne Sanders, Martha Gober 



Botlo 



-The I'.. S. (). House 



• • • The Beta Sigs are known to the students at 
Howard as having the skinniest, smallest girls on 
the campus. You can readily understand why the 
B. S. O's are thought of in this way when you stop 
and consider such small, thin girls as Anna Margaret 
Cowden, Bernice Brown, Venie Lee Martin, and 
Bobbie Nichols. 

Sure enough, honest, the Beta Sigs are one of the 
friendliest groups on the campus. And it's not because 
they don't have anything to he snooty about, because 
they do. Bobbie Nichols is secretary-treasurer of 
Kappa Pi Art Fraternity and she designed a cover for 
the H-Day program that would do credit to any 
artist. Helen Whitehead is in the beauty section and 
we don't know of a nicer girl. Mary Elizabeth Clap 
per had a short story published and is a star in girls 



athletics. Sue Smith was voted the most intellectual 
girl on the campus. Jane Mathews is one of the 
cutest, friendliest girls and her taste for clothes is 
hard to he matched. However she hasn't been as 
cheerful as usual since something happened between 
her and Charlie. 

This group lost two hard to replace girls in Bernice 
Brown and Lucile Poole by graduation. Lucile Poole 
almost graduated without a cap and gown. She was 
at the church minus this moth eaten equipment three 
minutes before time to march in the church. How 
ever she turned those large blue eyes on a timid senior 
bo] and he very willingly dashed to the "house", 
picked a window, and secured the centennial gar 
ments. 



95 



Allen 

\ NDERSON 

( '. W 1 N 

1 [ays 



Lipscomb 
Lowery 
McDaniel 
Meadows 



Murphy 
Neely 
Patrick 
Powers 



Prince 
Russell 

SCHWEINEBRATEN 
SlMONTON 



Thornton 
Volking 
Wasson 
Whitten 




^Delta ZLeta 



ALPHA PI CHAPTER 



OFFICERS 

President Katharine Russell 

Vice-President .....Carolyn Thronton 

Secretary VIRGINIA LlPSCOMB 

Treasurer JANE MURPHY 

MEMBERS 



Cecilia Anderson 
Ruth Allen 
Virginia Lipscomb 
Frances McDaniEL 
(Catherine Gwin 

Mary Frances Hays 
Bruce Lowery 

Jane Murphy 
Bettye Prince 

Anita Meadows 
Mary Sue Xeely 
Sue Patrick 
Katharine Russell 
Carolyn Thronton 

Jerry Powers 

Jewel Sen w kinerraten 
Dixie Volking 

Mary Jo WiiittEn 
Betty Simonton 
Mii.drEd YVasson 





Top — Virginia Lipscomb, Carolyn Thornton, 
Jane Murphy, and Kitty Russell 

Bottom — The Delta Zeta I louse 



• • • Delta Zeta with Kitty Russell at the helm 
kept itself well up among the other sororities this 
year. Resides being very friendly the girls of Delta 
Zeta have held important positions in various campus 
organizations. And not only did they "hold'' the posi- 
tions hut it can he said that these girls served well 
and effectively. 

Carolyn Thornton was a very capable and cooper 
ative president of Dietetics Club. The editor came 
to this evaluation after she had to "get the Liirls to 
gcther" five times before a suitable picture could be 
made for the liutre Xoits. Carolyn was also vice 
president of the Women's 1'an Hellenic Council. Kit 
ty Russell, besides serving as student advisor to two 
faculty members, was also secretary and treasurer of 
Women's Student Government. Frances McDaniel, 



who sure is around a lots of places, was vice-president 
of Chi Delta Phi. 

Scholastically, Delta Zeta ranks high. Each year 
the actives challenge the pledges to a race in scholar- 
ship. The losers give the winners a party. This 
year the losers gave a wild goose party. \fter a 
long chase. They met Dean Obenchain. The party 
was termed by everyone as a huge success. 

One of their most successful social events of the 
year was the annual founders day banquet and dance 
given in the fall. This spring their formal dance was 
all right since two Students who attended, h\ not 
losing any time, managed to make it to l-'.ast Lake 
Park for the Master Breakfast after the dance was 



AUSTON 

Barrow 
E. Bennett 
I. Bennett 



Cagle 

Ch ISOI.M 

Denley 
Edwards 



Frankun 
Granade 
Gregory 

Hoia'omi; 



Johnson 
Jones 
Lucius 
Monroe 



Murphree 
Patterson 

S i m s 

Strickland 



Thompson 

!•'.. Ward 
I.. Ward 






U 



ALPHA GAMMA CHAPTER 



OFFICERS 



President Marjorie Holcomb 

Vice-President .Lois MurphrEE 

Secretary Katherine Sims 

Treasurer - Florrie Thompson 



MEMBERS 

.Mary Alston 
Beverly Harrow 
Jaxe Baker 

Edna Jane Bennett 
Sara Chisolm 
Helen Cagle 
Elizabeth Edwards 

Jane Cook 

Mary Virginia GrEcory 
Martha Johnson 
Marjorie Holcomb 
Margaret Lee Monroe 
Lois Murphree 
Elaine Den ley 

Darlene Franklin 
Delouise Granade 
Mary Alice Lucius 
Martha PATTERSON 
Eunice Ward 
Lavinia Ward Zobrasky 
June Ray JonES 




Top — Marjorie Holcomb, Lois Murpree. 
Katherine Sims, and Florrie Thompson 

Bottom — The Phi Mu Lodge 



• • • During the summer when everyone was vaca- 
tioning, the Phi Mus were busy redecorating their 
lodge and hoping the ceiling would not fall. When 
the school bell rang in September the girls proudly 
displayed a new rug and a grand piano. So with 
the tinkling of tunes rushing began and the girls 
pledged nine freshmen with five more being pledged 
soon afterward. 

The wheel of activities began turning with a hay 
ride given at Paradise Lake for the new pledges. In 
spite of a full moon, a cool breeze, and a beautiful 
lake every one returned. Then came Halloween and 
a Spooky Party at the home of Elaine Dcnlcy. Mary 
Auston, of course, found the buried treasure and re- 
luctantly shared it with everyone else. 

Time marched on and so did Dan Cupid. 1 1 i ^ ar 
rows started flying at the Phi Mu Lodge in Sep- 
tember and from all indications they are still darting 
around. Katherine Reynolds married Hill Sims, Fa 
vinia Ward married Dan Zabrosky, Mary Virginia 



Gregory married lames Reynolds. Mary Louise Shir- 
ley married Gerow Hodges, and Jane Cook married 
J. R. Bennett. Who will be next? 

Along about February the girls felt the urge to 
return to childhood days and entertained with a Kid 
Party. Pest kids of all were Dr. Hull and Miss 
Brown who completely stole the show. 

\s usual, the Phi Mus held their usually amount 
of campus office! — In the Who's Who election on the 
campus Helen Cagle was voted the best all 'round 
girl, Margaret l.ee Monroe was voted the wittiest 
girl, and Marjorie Holcomb was elected Miss How- 
ard for the third year. Several of the girls were in 
the Glee Club. Margaret Fee Monroe held a class 
office. Martha Patterson was president of the fresh- 
men "Y" girls. Florrie Thompson and Marjorie Hol- 
comb held the offices ,,t secretary and vice-president 
of the general Y. W. C. V and were also members of 
Eiypatia . . . and so far, far into the night. 



| 99 



Adcock 

B VTSON 

Bearden 

Ben m: it 



Black 

Cannon 
Chisolm 

Donaldson 



KnKKi.nr 
Edgar 
Cam mill 
Holmes 



McLain 
McLendon 
Mize 
Quin 



Raw i. in son 
Saia 
Wade 
Wesson 




THETA ALPHA ZETA CHAPTER 



OFFICERS 

President Boh Cannon 

Vice-President Tilman Gladney 

Secretary . Rai.imi EdFELT 

Treasurer HUGH QuiN 

MEMBERS 

I "ox \l COCK 

Ray Bearden 
Charles Elack 
Bob Cannon 
Frank Donaldson 
Rai.imi EdFELT 

DeWitt Fletcher 
J. E. Gammiu 
Tillman Cladney 
Bert Holmes 
Tommy Jones 
Jack McLendOn 
1 1 UGH Quin 
J wiks W'a'ii- 
I). W. Patson 
Jack Chisolm 
I )eric Edgar 
Mack Guin 
Howaku McClain 
Edward McAnallv 
Roberi M i/.i: 
Vernon Rawlinson 
Carl Saw 
Frank SorrELL 
Ray Thomason 
J. R. Bennett 
I luVT Alverson 
Tom Collins 
Sam Cooper 
Austin Dean 



m^ at §m. ■ 

81 




VI 




'/"<»/' — Bob Cannon, Ralph Edfelt, Hugh Quin, 
and Tilman Gladney 

Bottom — The Lambda Chi House 



• • • If all the fraternities here on this campus 
were to hold a joint meeting and it at this meeting 
it was decided to hold a who's who election, then 
doubtless the Lambda Chi's would be voted by every 
fraternity man present without a dissenting vote as 
the most popular fraternity with the other fraternity 
men. And if at this who's who election the friendliest 
pair from separate fraternities were chosen, the two 
hoys who loved each other the most, then reinemher- 
ing their love scene on the Softball diamond, the 
other hoys would choose Sam Cooper and Al I )en- 
liani. 

Some eloquent speaker from the Pi K. A's would 
probably arise, and with meaning in his exes, congrat- 
ulate the Lambda Chi's on never arguing with the um- 



pires at such normally argumentive times as when the 
"most popular" group played such opponents as the 
Pi K A's or the Hoys' Dormitory. The fraternity 
men would then jump to their feet, clap their hands 
and saj . "amen". 

Truly, the Lambda Chi's have been active, progres- 
sive, and outstanding this year. During the summer 
the boys reworked and redecorated their house which 
was on the verge of falling in. Led by Donald Ad 
cock and Ralph Edfelt, they have participated actively 
in student politics. Their basketball team won the 
lutra-.Mural Cup the first half of the season. Their 

softball team came in second in the soft ball league 
this spring. 



Bee 

Byrd 



Chapman 
Cole 

Cork 



CORLEY 

Hand 

Holland 



Lackey 
McEachern 
Mitchell 
Nesbitt 



Riddle 
Rutledge 

Sim mons 

Tinklepaugh 






uppa 

ALPHA 



^Twka 



r 

PI CHAPTER 



OFFICERS 

President Charles McEachern 

Vice-President __ _Aloh Bee 

Treasurer ._ Robert Cork 

Secretary .-Stanley Hand 

MEMBERS 

James Alexander 
Alon Bee 

Stanley Bextley 
Roy Chapman- 
Robert Cork 
Paul Corley 
Clarence Daniel 
Stanley Hand 
Dewey Lackey 
Jimmy LEE 
Charles McEachern 
Ray Mills 
W. C. Nesbitt 
Mack NunnellEy 
Delona Patterson- 
Billy Riih i.e. 
Roy Simmons 

John TinklEpaugh 
Herbert Byrd 
Jerry Cole 
Gene Elliot 
Charles Mitchell 
Wilton Vaughn 
Frank Hii.i.ike 
Talmace Holland 
Oryille Rltledce 
Jimmy GoodlET 
Carl Cooper 
A i. Denham 




A 


» <H Jgfc 


^ 




\- K • 


H " ■ 






SpQ F- f 1 '1 










r ^tm 


^fc 





'/'<>/> — Charles McEachern, Alon Bee, Stanley 
Hand, and Robert Cork 

Huttoiii — The Pi K. A. House 



• • »The fraternity set a very patriotic example 
for the other fraternities on the campus this year. 
Instead of having a spring formal dance, the boys 
announced at a party given for the faculty and out- 
standing students that the money had been spent for 
a war bond. 

The Pikes, friendly and patriotic, are too, very 
active in the realms of student activities and student 
affairs. Billy Riddle climaxed a full four years by 
being a senior senator and chairman of the Publi- 
cations Board. Stanley Bentley did some very k (,i,( 1 
picture taking for the Entre Xous. Charles Mc- 
Eachern is president of the Junior Class for next 
year. The Pharmacy Club would doubtless die if it 



weren't for the support of "Bugs" Daniels and John 
Tinklepaugh. 

In the field of sports the chapter has some valiant 
representatives. A] Denham was an all Dixie Basket- 
ball player. Howard Sisson was an outstanding 
freshman football player. Both of these later boys 
starred in Softball. And who knows of a better intra- 
mural basketball player than Jimmie Goodlet? How- 
ever, as some folks say. he might be a little reluctant 
to shoot when he doesn't have the ball. But that's a 
sign of unselfishness. Another popular star is little 
Carl Cooper who is really "a good old boy" and in 
tins instance there is a demand for "good old boys". 



[03 



Ballard 
Harnette 
Branch 
Clayton 
Cochran e 



Cumm INS 
I )ou 1:1.1. 
Eddlem an 
Ellis 
Ellis 



V RIERSON 
G U N N 

( '. W I N 

I Iasski.i. 

[ORDAN 



McBrayer 
Powell 
Pearson 
Spier 



Storv 
Williams 
Wilson 

W'l NTON 






appa 

ALPHA 




ETA CHAPTER 



OFFICERS 

President __IRA GUNN 

Vice-President Carey Gwin 

Secretary - Tow in T. McBrayjsb 

Treasurer J- T. Ki.t.is 

MEMBERS 



Henry Ballard 
Derrell Barnette 
Frank Branch 
Carroll Clayton 
Walter CochrinE 
Mam.ky Cummins 
Arthur Dowell 

Elvia Eddleman 

Carl Ellis 

J. T. Ellis 
John Frierson 
Ira Gunn 
Cary Gwin 
William HassEll 
Tom Jordan 

Edwin T. .McBrayer 

1''red Pearson 
M. D. Powell 
Frank Story 
Horace Williams 
Brace Wilson 
Stewart Winton 
Sam Softon 
Ed Speir 




/ op — Edwin McBrayer, 
Gwin, and Ira Gunn 



J. T. Ellis, Carey 



Bottom — The Pi Kappa Phi House 



* * * The Pi Kappa Phis have gained the name, 
this year, of a temperance fraternity due to the sober 
conduct and high moral standards of its members. The 
l'i Kappa Phis have not only been temperate them- 
selves in such matters as alcohol and girls hut they 
have sought to reform some of the wilder members 
of the ministerial association. At the bead of this 
temperance and morality movement has been -you've 
guessed it already — Ira Gunn, with Henry Mallard. 
Speir, Lofton and Mauley Cummins close behind. 
Ira Gunn is also dependable, scholarly and energetic. 

However we must be sure to give praise to the One 
who set this truly commendable movement in mo- 
tion. Mauley Cummins spent four months in a quiet 
monastery known to the students as "The House of 
Killian". Here in the balls of this stimulating sanc- 
tuary, Cummins came under the influence of two 



noble men. Monk "Jerky" John Dodd, and Monk 
"Jelly Kelly" (It's not Kelly) Bennett, Vfter study- 
ing with these dear hermits for four months, Man- 
ley's heart was so on fire that he was commissioned 
a missionary and dispatched to the Pi Kappa Phi 
bouse to minister to the brethren who lived in that 
place. 

Coming back to some real facts the chapter has a 
number of outstanding men. Arthur Howell is a 
member of Trident and be is also doing some origi- 
nal work in chemistry. Manley Cummins is an 
A. E. D. and rather intelligent, popular laboratory in- 
structor. Ira Gunn has written a little for the Crim- 
son and the Untie Sous. Carej Gwin has been a 

member of the Publication Board, and a member of 

\. !•:. d. 



1(C) 



Allen 
Bryan 
Caused 
De vson 



Etheridge 
Gwin 
Hill 
Hodges 



HOC AN 

Johnson 
Kirk land 
Lawrence 



McCalley 

McDonald 
MOBLEY 

Reynolds 



Richev 
Rutland 

W \LDKN 

Ward 
Wilkes 




a 



S^)Lama V ft 

IOTA 



CHAPTER 



OFFICERS 

Commander .._ _ Seymour Wilkes 

/./. Commander HARVEV WARD 

Recorder Kimball John son 

Treasurer Thomas Bryan 



MEMBERS 



Thomas Bryan 
Weaver Allen 
Oscar Causey 
James Dfason 
Billy Gwin 

Kimball Johnson 
Morris Ftheridge 
Charles Mabery 

Kimsey Lawrence 
Charles McDonald 
Curtis Wai.den 
Bob McCalley 
Joe Rutland 
HroH Reynolds 
Seymour Wilkes 
Harvey Ward 

James RichEy 
James Shakman 
Woodrow Taylor 
John Richardson 
Roscoe IIoc.an 
Rex Mobi.ey 
Charles Crandoll 





Top — Seymour Wilkes. Harvey Ward, Kim- 
ball Johnson, and Thomas Bryan 

Hoftom — The Sigma \'u House 



• • 'The Sigma Xu Fraternity hoys on the How- 
ard Campus have come to be hailed as campus intel- 
lectuals and campus scholars. This appellation has 
descended to the fraternity because of the scholastic 
records of such brilliant men as Woodrow Taylor, 
Thomas Bryan, J. M. Deason, Rex Mobley, and the 
Richie boys, not to mention Bob McCalley. 

( )n the Softball diamond the Si^ma Nu's gained the 
admiration of everyone who saw them gel beat for 
the very noticeable grace and form with which they 
played the game. Again it is only fair and right 
that we mention the name of Woodrow Taylor first 
although it was hard to place his name before that of 
Thomas Bryan, again, not to mention Bob McCalley. 



Really meaning what is said, the Sigma Nu's pledg- 
ed a most popular promising student when the) pin 
tied the button on "Gopher" Sharman, president of 
the Junior Class this year and president of the Senior 
Class next year. More noticeable members are: 
Kimball Johnson who waged a most colorful cam- 
paign for the presidency of the student body; Oscar 
Causey, Jr., who is admired for his "natural" at- 
tractive blond hair; Seymour Wilkes, vice-president 
ot Masquers, managing editor of the '-11 Entre Vous, 

student senator; W.irmi Holes who made all \'s this 
last semester; Hilly ("win whom We all miss; and 

Harvey Ward, photographer extraordinary, and a 

guy whom we can't help but miss because there's so 
much to he missed. 



I lm I 



a 



ana 



¥ 



Through the deep mist there looms 

\ tall gray shadow. 

\ shadow that seems to reach out 
And grasp at me 
As I wander near its 

I errible, reaching arms. 
The silence is depressing ; 
But suddenly, o'er the awful silence 
Comes voices, many voices, golden voices; 
And fairies come tripping o'er the hill 
Bringing the rose and gold sheet of dawn; 
And it is sprinkled with dewdrop diamonds 
Which hurst and fall and form a carpel 
Suitable for dancing fairy feet. 
All. what ghost can stand 
Before the tinkling laugh of fairies? 
So the night mist steals away : 
.And the shadow, the tall gray shadow- 
That had so appalled me, 
Stands before me in the morning 
.Showered with the diamonds 
That the fairies left behind them. 
And no longer is a shadow- 
Hut a tall. "Tern tree ! 

Ah. hut Cod is like that ! 
I was groping in the darkness 
Through the awful misty darkness 
-And a shadow loomed before me 
And 1 cowered hack afraid. 
Then suddenly through the mist — 
Through the awful choking mist 
Came a sound of wondrous beauty 
Like the sound of silvered lutes. 
And my wonder grew and grew 
As the music came toward me 
And engulfed me in its beauty. 
Then it was no longer dark 
\nd the mist had gone away. 

The dawn had come — and it was beautiful! 
Too wonderful for human eyes to look al. 
Then I bowed my head to pray; 
For the shadows all had fled 
And God was there ' 

Rees Watkins 



IDS 




COACH William C. Wii [TE 



William C. White 

Head football coach, or at least 
he was; now it's just athletic di- 
rector, lie's more widely known 
as "Bill" and "Cannonball." 
Played his collegiate football 
for the University of Tennessee 
Was verj successful as Ramsay 
High School mentor before 
coming to Howard in the 
spring of 1940. Began building 
for the future and his results 
were beginning to show forth 
when Howard discontinued foot- 
ball. Last two freshmen teams 
were regarded as among best 
in Howard's history, heating 
Auburn frosh both years. Here's 
hoping he hangs around until 
the Bulldogs go forth on the 
gridiron once more. 



VL C O A C H E S 



Jim Stuart 

Assistant football coach, and he used to be, too. Vlso, 
head basket hall coach and a darn good one. Coach 
Jim. and as always in the past, the "lovable Yankee," 
was a Bulldog himself not so many years ago. one of 
Howard's all-time l»st ends. He was captain of the 
basket hall team three- years, which is quite an honor. 
For the past few years he's been 
transferring that cage knowl- 
edge to Bulldog stars coming 
up and stars they were after 
learning from Coach Jim. Right 
now it looks as though he may 
pitch in with Uncle Sam — so. 
here's another hope that another 
guy's back around Howard 
when the thing's all over. 



Lew Bostick 

Was assistant football coach and 
freshman basket ball boss Cap- 
tained the University of Ala- 
bama Crimson Tide in 1938 and 
after a year in pro ball, cam 
Howard. Was strict with his 



gridders because he wanted them to learn and play 

ball as a business. Results of his work were seen in 
the fine lineman Howard turned out. After Howard 
quit the game, he accepted a job elsewhere. A wish 
for continued success in life to him. 




Coach Jim Stuart 

f no 1 



Coach Lew Bostick 



aJ CHEERLEADERS 



What football coach would rejoice because he 

had a sum total of no ends, two tackles, one 
guard, one center and four hacks from which 
to build a team? That's not hard to answer. But 
that total represents all that Coach Bill White 
had to give Howard a team of which she could 
be proud — that and a group of darn good soph- 
omores. And in those sophs lies the key to 
Howard's success on the gridiron in 1 J>41 — 
success despite a record of four triumphs, five 
losses and a tie. Come down to earth, sub- 



tract those three defeats by Southeastern Con- 
ference outfits and you have four victories. 
two losses and a tie. 

The Bulldogs travelled down to Montgomery 
and Cramton Bowl to open against the Auburn 
Tigers, a team that was rated a three or four 
touchdown favorite. Auburn managed a score 
in the first quarter and then were stopped cold 
by a firm Howard line until late in the final 
period when the tired Bulldogs yielded anoth- 
er. Jimmy Tarrant, Howards crack little passer. 
was handicapped by the inability of his re- 
ceivers to hold onto his aerials. Up front. 
Captain Woodrow Taylor and Dave Drake 
fought doggedly to hold the Tigers at bay and 
did a neat job of it, too. Able assistance was 
rendered by Carl Folds, Andy Vaughan and 
Prank Cuffaro. 



Vance Vernon 
Warren Hutchison 

\ck Chisholm 
Margaret Lee Monroe 

Doris TarrET 





W'oodrow Taylob 
David DRAKE 



VL C A P T A I N S 



Spring Hill's Badgers were unfortunate enough 
td oppose Howard the following week. The 
Bulldogs' offense that never got started against 
Auburn broke loose in high gear and the Badg- 
ers bowed, :!l-ii. To name stars in this tilt 
would be listing the entire team. Special men- 
tion, though, goes to Austin Dean, Earl Gart- 
man. Red Rest. Buck Williams. Jimmy Tarrant. 
\ndv Vaughan, John Christopher — hey, this is 
a list. At any rate, it was a grand display of 
football for Major Davis who accompanied the 
team to Mobile. 

Then — wow! This account says Alabama ii">. 
Howard <•. Looks like either the scorekeeper 
or Howard had an off day. We'll check on it 
and see. Let's just skip it for the present, 
though. 

The two powers of the Dixie Conference met 
in Anniston the following Friday night in a 
never-to-be-forgotten battle. The Chattanooga 



Moccasins were on the long end of 2 to 1 
odds and things looked dark for the Bulldogs. 
The railbirds said it was up to Tarrant, later 
chosen on the third Little All-America team, 
to pull Howard through. So Jimmy took it 
upon himself to run through the entire Chatta- 
nooga team fifty yards for a T.D. after the 
Snakes had taken a 7-0 lead. Little Red Best, 
place-kick specialist, calmly booted the seventh 
point and the Bulldogs earned a 7-T tie. 

A trip to Miami and the Orange Bowl was next 
on the menu. The oranges and scenery, etc. 
were fine. 19-0, not in our favor. 

Tampa University came up for a Legion Field 
tilt next week. The game was rated a toss-up 
and no one was wont to disagree with those 
odds after it was all over, either. Though, the 
attendance didn't reflect it. that was far and 
away the best afternoon of football played at 
the Field all year. Tarrant (that name's just 



[ 112 ] 






keeps bobbing up, somehow) started off the 
fireworks with a I 1-yard trek for a 6-0 lead 
for Howard. Tampa came right hack, scored, 
converted and led, 7-6. 1 Inward drove deep, 
couldn't quite make it and in came Red Best 
A field goal right through the uprights made 
it 9-7, Howard. The Bulldogs were evidently 
inspired by that lead for they promptly pushed 
over another T.I), and were ahead. 16-7. Tam- 
pa retaliated with a score to pull within three 
points. Then for five minutes, Bulldog rooters 
held on while enemy passes fell all over the 
field hut Tampa was licked. And that's a pleas- 
ant memory. 

Tennessee 28-6, hut that six looked good. 

A Jaunt a little further north produced a 20-6 

victory over \\ estern Kentucky Teachers with 
Phil Winters. Tarrant. Milton Hoderes, Buck 



Williams, Andy Vaughan and all the gang 
chippin' in. 

Back down to, Legion Field for a Thanksgiving 
gO with Mercer's Bears and a 27-6 win. Pretty 
easy. The Hears scored first. Tarrant went in 
and had a T.D. in four plays. The boys chalked 
up three more in the first half and then took 
the afternoon off. Neither scored in the second 
half. Brightest spots probably were the play of 
Jack Hartsfield at end, Townsend and Richard- 
son at center, and Dean at wing. Al Sanders 
and Carl Cooper were in there, too. But fate 
struck hard that cold, rainy afternoon. Jimmy 
Tarrant was hurt. And so the following week — 

Rollins 28, Howard 0. Ouch! that one hurt. 
But we didn't mind so much. We had a team 
that put out and that's all we asked. We're 
proud of those '11 Bulldogs. 



and SQUAD 





James T mulant • ISO- 
pound junior tailback from 
Birmingham. The most 
dreaded back in the Dixie* 
C< inference in years Chi >s 
en All I )i\ic both soph and 
junior years, < tally soph to 
attain the honor in 1939, 
His brilliant passing and 
running earned Him a po- 
sition on the third-string 
Utile America tram. 

Frank Cufearo 185- 
pound sophomore en 

Wheeling, W. Va. Crack 

defensive man : did a tot of 

punting. Chattanooga will 
always remember him. 



^Jke 



I >urwood Williamson 
164-pound senior tailback 

fn mi Silma. I tampered all 
the way through from his 
freshman year, Durwood 
recovered from a knee in- 
jury in time to turn in fine 
performances in Howard's 
last three gani< S. 

Dick Compton — 154-pound 
sophomore wingback from 
Montgomery. Good punter 
and i>ass receiver. 



Warren 'Red' Hist — 1 54- 
pound sophomore tailback 
from Jasper. Another fel- 
low the>- thought couldn't 
make the grade because of 
his size. Noted for his 
place-kicking. Meat Tampa 
on a field goal. Missed 
only two conversions entire 
year. 

James Sharman — 168- 
pound junior blocking-back 
from Roanoke. Proved 
valuable as a reserve 
his first two years. Filled 
in nicely when first-string- 
er was injured. Stands 
high scholastically. Well- 
liked by all gridders and 
students. 



Austin Dean — 177-pound 
sophomore wingback from 
Hanceville. Good punter, 
best pass-receiver on the 
team. Good runner to boot. 

Buck Williams — 171- 
pound full-hack from Chip- 
ley, Florida. Started the 
season as a reserve but 
soon earned a starting 
berth. Hit that line with 
plenty of drive. 




PLAYERS 



Tarrants off again. Poor guy — they all missed him! 




*»-»>i 



, ,. 



-I*vj '^' 



«se 




Action against a llama ball carrier 




ore 



P L A Y E 




Earl Gartman — 1/4 
pound junior wingback 
from Birmingham. Known 
for hi-- pass-catching abil- 
ity in the Tarrant-to-C.art 
combination. 

Phillip Winters — 188- 
pound sophomore blocking- 
back from Pineapple. One 
of tlie best in the business 



\i.\i\ Denham — 170- 
pound sophomore end from 
Alexander City. Good foot- 
baller but better known for 
his top-notch basketball 
ability. 

Andy Vaughan — 176- 
pound sophomore end from 
Altoona. Tough as they 
come ; excellent on defense. 
Called by Coach White an 
All-Dixie man with some 
to spare. 



Jack Haktsfiki.d — 153- 
pound sophomore end from 
Birmingham. Generally 
conceded to be too small 
for college football, this lad 
earned the respect of team- 
mates and opposition alike 
with his pass catching and 
defensive play. 

John Richardson — 190- 
pound junior center from 
Cortelyou. Understudy at 
the pivot post as a soph, 
John became the Bulldogs' 
regular center in 1941 and 
did a swell job of it. Best 
work was in hacking the 
line. 



R S 




**•?.*$ 



Captain Woodrov* Taylor 
204 pound senior tackle 
from Wedowee. ( )ne of the 
must aggressive football 
players at Howard in 
years, Woodrow was a 
litth columnist in enemy 
backfields. Thought by 
teammates and Bulldog 
coaches to be the best tack 
le in the I )ixie Conference, 

Made Georgia Tech's 1940 

All-Opponents team. 

Jack Carter 180 pound 
tackle from Nanasalia, Ala.. 
turned in good relief work, 








Milton Hodges 1 ( '_'- 

|)(itiiul sophomore tackle 
from Birmingham. Kick- 
off man for the Bulldogs. 
Finished the '41 si ason 
wuh a rush. 

Tonnie Cody -210-pound 
sophomore tackle from Ex- 
i 1 1 urn nt. Georgia. More 
than not called Josh. 
Improved fast and was .1 
id sub for Taylor at 
tackle. 



P L 



Williamson 

Caki. Cooper — 166-pound 
guard from Clanton. Little 
guj but full of fight. Saw 
plenty of reserve service. 



Dave Drake — 193-pound 
senior guard from Owens 
Cross Roads. Alternate 
captain. Chosen All- Dixie 
and well lie was. Said 
C a c h Bill White: 
"Wouldn't exchange him 
fur any guard in the con- 
ference." Was highly hon- 
] fur his ability by be- 
ing invited to play in the 
annual North-South foot- 
ball game at Montgomery. 

Bill Solley - 182-pound 
sophomore guard from 
Guntersville. Shifted from 
the backfield, Solley caught 
in quick to his guard du- 
ties and played like a vet- 
eran. 




I KI>lol'HKI< 



Kki.lv Baker 



TOWNSEND 



A Y E R S 



John CrisTophEr — 192-pound sophomore guard from 
Butler. Little-heralded but a valuable man indeed. Moved 
up from frosh team right into a regular job with the var- 
sity. 

Kixi.v BakER — 170-pound sophomore center from Hunts- 
ville. Didn't see much service this year, but had promise. 

John TowxsExd — 172-pound sophomore center from 
Faulkville. Light but scrappy. Gave regular center the 
battle of his life for starting honors. 



t'f>f>cr rii/ht — A Bulldog and two Tidesmcn reach for it. 
Lower — Dean goes over the tup against Mercer. 




Vke FRESHMAN TEAM 



Howard's Bullpups weren't to be outdone by 
their predecessors, so the) gol righl down to 
business and knocked off Auburn's freshmen in 
the annual benefit game at Legion Field ran 
all over 'em, too. Most pre-eminent in that vic- 
tory were Sam Cooper, Billy Burns, fimmy 
Weeks, Ernest and Joe Morton, 1 Inward Sis- 
son, Donald Cunningham, Casey Jones and 
Kin Bryant. 

The Bullpups lost a hard-fought affair n> the 
Alabama freshmen, 13 in 0, in their inaugural. 
Following their triumph over Auburn, the) fell 
down against Chattanooga's Baby Snakes, los- 
ing in the last five minutes on a fluke pass, 20 
tn L3. They took that one on the chin, though, 
and went on to win an easy one from Sulligent 
1 ligh School. 

On the ha>ket ball court, the Bullpups were 
just getting started when football was dropped. 




Mull Pups inmc in to crush a Snake 



Most i>f them went elsewhere to school then. 
But let it be said, that frosh team was one of 
the most promising Howard ever had. And 
other schools where those Bullpups enrolled 
will reap the benefits. 



The frosh team at ease 



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[ 120 | 




Waiting for a long one to go through 
— It looks good! 



BASKETBALL atJLaJ 



With only one man on the squad above a sopho- 
more, Coach Jim .Smart's I Inward cagers made 
a name and a pretty Fair record For themselves 
on the court this year. The Bulldogs were 



credited with 13 victories and seven defeats 
tor the regular season, then came out even with 
a win and a loss in the annual Dixie Confer- 
ence tournament. 



The 1 ( '41-4J Varsity Squad, front row — Peterson, Guin, Edgar, Denham, Wesson and Epsman. 
Back row — Coach Stuart, Jones, Fleming, Baker, Slaughter, Pittman, Crouch and Manager 
Mad )onald. 





^Jke 



Playing around with the 
Celtics. 



More- often called Howard's sophs rather than 
Howard's Bulldogs because of an all-sopho- 
more starting quintet, the team started the 
L941-42 campaign with an easy triumph over 
St. Bernard, then lost a couple of close ones 
to Mississippi Statjj. Followed an easy de- 
cision over Jacksonville Teachers and a cred- 
itable performance against the Celtics. 

Y.M.H.A. pasted a close defeat on the Bull- 
dogs at this stage, hut this one wt^ avenged in 
a most humiliating way for the Jackets later 
on; score was 80-47. Five straight victories 
were next in order with Mississippi College, 
Chattanooga, Sewanee, Millsaps and Mississip- 
pi College again K<>insj down in that order. 
Loyola came up with a triumph over the Bull- 
dogs, hut the Baptists came right hack the next 
night and pasted Spring I [ill. A journey to Au- 
burn proved not so good, the Tigers coming 
forth in late minutes to chalk up a victory. 



Spring Hill came up to Causey and pulled the 
biggest surprise of the season by going home 
with a one-point verdict. Chattanooga and 
Sewanee visited Causey on strictly routine 
business and went out the hack door and 
Y.M.H.A. wasn't long in following. Loyola 
made a stab at dumping the Stuartmcn again 
hut Howard wasn't exactly in the mood for a 
defeat and the Wolfpack went home empty- 
handed. 

That triumph over the Wolves made Howard 
co-favorites with them in the Dixie meet the 
following week. The Bulldogs eliminated Mis- 
sissippi College in the first round, but went 
out via the Loyola route in their second tilt. 

The Bulldog regulars received south-wide pub- 
licity when every one of them soared over the 
100 mark in total points scored. They were 
probably the only team in this section of the 
country to accomplish that feat. 



I 122 ] 



PLAYERS 



Dbbic Edgar — Regular sopho 
more center. Had excellent co- 
ordination; ran up highest total 
points for single game — 21. 

Horace Peterson — Regular soph- 
omore forward. Consistent and 
crack one-hand shot. 

John Pittmax — Sophomore. Al- 
iut for first time. Promises 
to develop well. 



ABE F.psman — Regular sophomore 
guard. I'ncanny in shooting; 
hot when he once got going. 



Kenny Raker — Junior, and only 
ane on team. Good defensive 
man. 

CLARENCE Slaughter — Sopho- 
more. First year out and he im- 
proved fast. 



Wheeler Flemming — Regular 
sophomore forward-. Dependable: 
only man on squad to score in 
every game of season. Second 
All-Dixie. 

Tommy Jones — Sophomore. 
Proved invaluable as relief man. 



Doc Wesson — Sophomore. First 
vear out. Fans' favorite. 



Al Denham — Regular sophomore 
guard. Top-notch floor man ; long 
shot artist. Made All-Dixie hon- 



Mac Guin — Sophomore. Saw lut> 
of reserve service. 



Eugene Crouch Sophomore 

sub; was developing weu when 
he quit. 




■ 



Jke pi 



ff 



With the purpose of encouraging good sports- 
manship on the part of the athletes and of giv- 
ing direction to their social activities, the II 
Club is composed of all athletes <>n the campus 
who earn a letter in a major sport and merit 
the approval of the general body. And "in a 
major sport" now means **in basket ball" as 
the war lias cut Howard's athletic endeavors to 
thai lone >port. 

Until the present emergency caused football 
to pass on. the II Club sponsored the animal 
H-Day celebration which featured an intra- 



squad football attraction. Now the Club co- 
operates witb oilier organizations in continuing 
H-Day as one of tin- big events of the year. 

A new plan of qualification for membership 
may be worked out for next year as. if only bas 
ket ball lettermen are admitted, ranks would 
soon be depleted. 

'file organization lias a club room in Causey 
Gynasium where heretofore weekly meetings 
have been held. It sponsors some major social 
event each year, usually a dance, which is well 

attended. 



/'resident 

I 'ice-President 

Secretary 



OFFICERS 



Dave Drake 

I AM Ms S HARM AN 

1 1 m my Tarrant 



Treasurer John Richardson 

Custodian WOODROW Taylor 



MEMBERS 



Dave Drake 

Jimmy Tarrant 
Woodrow Taylor 

Mil. Ton I [ODGI S 



Cart, Folds 
Carl Cooper 
James Sharman 

John Richardson 
[ohn Christopher 



Warren Best 

Durwood Williamson 
Austin Dean 
Phillip Winters 



I 124 ] 



CLUB... 



First Row — Kelly Baker, Kenny Baker, Nelson Ball, Warren Best, Jack Carter. 
Second Row — John Cristopher, Dick Compton, Carl Cooper, Austin Dean, Alvin Denham. 
Third Row — Dave Drake, Carl Folds, Earl Gartman, Kimsey Lawrence, John Richardson. 
Fourth Row — James Sharman. Woodrow Taylor, John Townsend, Phillip Winters. 




imammm 



^rntra 



MURALS 



With the temporary abandonment of football, 
intra-murals blossomed forth at Howard this 
year. There were perhaps twice ;b many stu- 
dents actively participating as in past years, 
and various tournaments throughout the year 
kepi interest at a high level. 

The touch football season produced several 
good teams, tops of which was Lambda Chi 

Alpha fraternity. The Lambda Chi's won the 
school championship and then howled over 
chapters of their fraternity at the University of 
Alabama and at Birmingham-Southern. 

fntra-mural basket hall play was started with 
a tournament, which the Preachers dominated 
all the way. They turned hack Lambda Chi in 
the championship contest, with Robert Wooddy 
registering every one of the winners' points. 
The "pennant chase" saw Boys Dorm come 
through with a well-balanced team to take first- 
place honors. 

Boys Dorm and Lambda Chi were nip and 
tuck all the way through regular season play 
and right on through the title game of the 
playoff in softball. The teams split a pair of 
idts before entering the playoff. Dave Drake 
tor Dorm and Tom Collins were the mound op- 




Davic I >rake tak< s 



McLendon waits lot 



poncnts and both could really hum 'em in 
there. Their duel in the championship game 
topped them all. Dorm was victorious by a 
whisker. •'! to 2. 

A few of the many standouts of the season 
included, besides Drake and Collins. Jimmy 
Sharman, Clarence Slaughter, Mac Guin, flay 
Thompson, Al Denham and Winnie Brooks. 



All-Star intramural basketball team: Left to right, James Sharman, Robert Wooddy, How- 
ard Sisson, Jimmy Goodlett and Austin Dean. 




126 





mamza 




^Jnden 



t 



I iFFICERS 

I' resident 

I 'ice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 



August Lovegi 
Kelly Gladdi n 
Borum Bishop 



Donald Adcock 
N ish Collier 
Bert Holmes 



MEMBERS 

Si r\\ art I '.i U 
Vivian ('.ir.ro 
August Lovegren 



I'ni.i \i Bishop 
Kelly Glad i:\ 
Stew art Win ton 



Trident is recognized as the highest honor that may be conferred on a young man 

at Howard College. Its membership is made up of men of unusual ability and in- 
tellect. The requirements for admittance correspond to those of Phi Beta Kappa. 
Members of the Junior Class who have maintained a high scholarship in all their 
work and also participated in numerous extra-curricular activities are selected as 
members. Those selected must he endorsed by the faculty as to character, ability, 
and potentiality for future service before being officially tapped. After the final 
selections are mafic, a public tap service is held at a special chapel program late in 
the spring. 

The founders realized that those men who attained membership would be the 
finest men on the campus. The members of this organization prove this to be true. 
They are the students who are looked up to and of whom we exped much in the 
future. 



THE HIGHEST HONOR ORGANIZATION FOR MEN 



I 128 | 




Jk 



w 



tu 



ana 



Abercrombie 

HOLCOMB 

James 



McDaniei. 
Thompson 

We avkr 



OFFICERS 



President 



Jean- McDaniei. 



Secretary .... Kathrvn ABERCROMBIE 

Treasurer _. Mary Em. a James 



MEMBERS 



Jean McDaniei, 

Mary Ella James 
Florrie Thompson 



Kathryn Abercrombie 
Ann Weaver 

MarjoriE I [olcomb 



Hypatia is the highesl honorary organization for women on Howard campus. It> 
membership comprises those girls who combine scholarship, leadership, character, 
and the promise of future usefulness. Each spring the members of the Junior 
Class are considered in order to determine those girls who represent more nearly 
the highest type of Howard co-ed. 

Hypatia was organized secretly in L924 to meet the need of a strictly honorary 
society for woman students. Since that time it has become recognized on the cam- 
pus as the highest honor that can he conferred on a young woman. Every mem- 
ber has received high recognition in various fields of study and activity. From it- 
ranks have come over one hundred girls whose records after graduation have been 
the fulfillment of the founder's purpose. 



THE HIGHEST HONOR ORGANIZATION FOR WOMEN 



I L29 I 



\i:i RCROM I 
\i>cock 

r.n.i 



CilPBS 

I [OLCOMB 
I lOLMl - 

J Wllv 



McDaniel 

NlAGER 

Sc \ \ N I l.l.\ 
\\ i: \\ ik 




Who's Who ^J4mona J^tudentd 

IN AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES 



M vry ECathryn Aber< rombie 

I "(IN M.h \lKTKK 

Stew art Bell 
Sue Blanton 



Vivian Gibbs 

m arjorie hoi.c'omi! 
Eugene Holmes 
Mary Ella James 



August Lovegren 
Jean McDaniel 
Jones Niager 
Anne Scannelly 
Ann Weaver 



Coming as a crowning honor to a number of the seniors at Howard each year is 
the selection into Who's Who in American Universities and Colleges. This group 
of senior^ represents the best that the colleges throughout the land have to offer in 
the way of good material for the advancement of society. Its purpose is to act as 
an incentive for the students to set their goals high and then work hard to reach 
them. 

Published annually, Who's Who is a compilation of biographies of tin- out- 
standing student- in America. To he included in its ranks a student must have a 
combination of qualities to indicate that he is an asset to his school. These quali- 
ties are: character, leadership, scholarship and potentialities of future usefulness 
to business and society. Certainly it can he considered as one of the highesl honors 
bestowed upon the college -indent. 



THE THIRTEEN MOST OUTSTANDING SENIORS 



I 130 I 




^rlpka (^psllon <=Jjelt 



Burnett 
Conerly 

Cummins 
Gibbs 

Cooper 



Godwin 
Gwin 

Harris 
Lewis 
lovegren 



Makkkk 
Mize 
Russell 
strickland 

WlNTON 



President 
Vice-President. 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



OFFICERS 



Evan Lewis 

Vivian Gibbs 

Ruth Harris 

Helen Strickland 



Hoyt Alverson 
Macox BURNETT 

Claire Conerly 
Manley Cuw mins 
\'i\ [an Gibbs 



MEMBERS 

Doris Godwin 
Carey Gw in 
Ruth Harris 
Evan Lewis 
August Lovegren 



K avk Markee 
Robert Mize 
Kathryn Russell 
I In in Strickland 
Stewart WinTon 



The Alabama Beta Chapter of A. F. D., established at Howard College in 1928, 
was the second of thirty-three national chapters to be organized. It is a purposeful 
organization, serving to bridge the gap between pre-medical education and medical 
school, as well as maintaining a bond of friend hip among pre-medical students 
and their faculty members. Its members are selected from the top-ranking students 
in the pre-medical and laboratory technician work. 

During the year, outstanding visitors from the medical profession spoke to 
\. I*".. I), members and guests. A. F. I), brought medical movies to the campus, 
visited the local hospital and the University of Alabama Medical School, and gave 

a farewell banquel for its seniors who will soon enter medical or graduate school. 



MAINTAINS FRIENDSHIP AMONG THE PRE-MEDS. 




^y^ttpyia /^ 


yii vymeaa 


OFFICERS 




I'rrsidoit 


Gk< RRB Hagood 


1 'ice-President 


Lor is 


Armstrong 


Secretary 


ROSCOl Hoi DSM ITU 


Treasurer 


C>RA>\ 


Fullerton 


MEMBERS 




Marion Albright Grady Fullerton 


August Lovegren 


[esse Matthew s 


I. oris Armstrong Oscar IIirtt 


Billie Riddle 


Lionel Patton 


George BaglEy Roscoe Goldsmith 


[ames Wade 


Clarence Si. mjghter 


A ion BEE Carey Gwin 


I. X. IIirtt 


Robert Woody 


Thomas Bryan Bert Holmes 


"Doc" W'fsson 


Billy Stephenson 


Ioiix Dodd George Hagood 


Jkrry Cole 


Gerald Tidwell 


Deric Edgar Ralph Johnson 


Harold Rhodes 


J \( k I ).\VIS 



Alpha Phi Omega is a national service fraternity composed of college men who 
are or have been previously affiliated with the Scouting Movement. The purpose 
of the fraternity is to assemble college men in the fellowship of the Scout Oath 
and Laws, to develop friendship and to promote service to humanity. The fra- 
ternity was founded at Lafayette College in Eastman, Pennsylvania, by a group 
of former scouters who recognized the desirability of carrying on into their campus 
life the ideals and principles which were instilled in their boyhood days. 

Here on our Campus under the guidance of President George Hagood and the 
faculty advisors. Dr. Owens, Dr. Wilcox, and Mr. (member, this fraternity has 
been of service to the student body and faculty. Every fall the members of the 
fraternity edit and distribute a Student Director} to the students. This year the 
fraternity also installed a post office. 



FULFILLS THE IDEALS OF UNSELFISH SERVICE 



I 132 | 




PL 



armac 



President 

I 'ice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



t 



L^tub 



OFFICERS 



Bu.uk Roberts 

James Warren 

__Darlene Fran ku n 

Katih.yx Parson 



The Kappa Psi Pharmaceutical Fraternity finally shrunk and shrunk until the 
members felt that they had shrunk to too small an organization to have a page in 
the annual so they very generously gave their space to the Pharmacy Club, a much 
larger and more democratic organization. 'Phis club this year has been under the 
leadership of Billy Roberts, senior honor student. Every so often the club meets 
to discuss drug store affairs. The atmosphere in which these meetings are held 
is very conductive to frank discussions by the experienced "drug store hoys" as to 
how is the best way to deal with this type or that type of drug store customers. 

However, not only are means of salesmanship discussed by various phases of 
pharmaceutical science are dealt with which enlighten the students on topics out- 
side the drug store. This year one of the chief objectives of the club has been to 
point out that there are many, many positions in the field of pharmacy besides 
the drug store which is usually visioned by the average American when pharmacy 
i> mentioned. All the members of the Pharmacy Department are members of the 
Pharmacy Club. 



ACQUAINTS MEMBERS OF THE PHARMACY DEPT. 



L33 









Di 


%e ( 


GLEE 






GIRLS' GLEE 


CLUB 










OFFICERS GIR 


l.S 




Pres 
1 'ice 


Pres 

tar y 


dent 
Treast 




Margar 
Dori 


:t Ward 
- Godwin 

1 II IN AN 
VRTINSON 


Seer 


»•<•/• 


J KAN B 

K \ in i.i in M 


Dire 




SOPP \\<>s 






MEMBERS GIR 


,s 




J Ki Q\ ii.ini; B \c.\\ i i.i. 
Beverly Barrcm 
Sue Blanton 

S VRA Ch ISOLN 

Elaine Den lev 
Mary Dickinson 
Frances Duke 
Theresa Franks 






Edna Joe Medli n 
Virginia Mehafffa 
M.\m Sue X 1:1 i.v 
Lucille Poole 
< '.i raldine Pow ers 
Betty Prince 
Mable Saffles 
Kathleen Scott 




Gladys Stamps 
Myrtice Thomason 
Margaret Ward 
Mildred Wesson 
Jane Claire Wood 
Barbara Woods 
[Catherine Wrenn 


SECOND SOPRANOS 












K \ IHUVN Abercrombie 

Ruth Allen 

I'.l I'll WAN 

Carolyn Clemmer 
Esta Bell Coshatt 
Doris Godwin 
Betty Jam-: Boulditch 
Sara Jordan 




Mildred Lovegren 
Amta Meadows 
Mary Helen Sartain 
Saka Sugg 

Reese Watkins 
ALTOS 
Terry Barnard 
Betsy Barnes 




Vivian Houlditch 
Mary Ell * .1 vmes 
Virginia Hull 
I'.vka Dell Petria 
Evei \ n Rhodes 
K\ i:n n Scarbrougb 
Doris Earle Sm alley 

Saka WILLIAMS 






BOYS' GLEE 


CLUB 










OFFICERS— BOYS 




Pres 
I 'ice 
Seen 


drill 
Pres 
•tary- 
tor 


dent 
Treasu 


ICV 


r.n.iA 

Ralpi 
Carl 

In ITHLEEN M 


1)1. WITT 

Edfelt 
Whirley 

ARTIASON 


Direi 










MEMBERS— BOYS 




FIRST TENOR 
Tom Collins 
Elvin Eddleman 
Eugene Jordan 
Milton Pope 
\ ernon rawlinson 
Joe Riddle 
Woodrow Wilson 






FIRST BASS 
Louis Akmsi i ■ ■ 
Harold Barnes 
Guy Case^ 
Robert Cork 
Billy Gwin 
Gerald Tidwell 




JOE Know i i g 
augusi lovegren 
Norman Lovecren 
Howard Prichard 
Horace Stephens 
Mack Harper 
Doc Wesson 
Carl Whirled 


SEO >ND TENOR 
Mason Bondurant 
curley bowen 
John (.'now 
Douglas Davidson 
George Jackson 
Charles Mitchell 
Fred Pearson 




< 


Clyde Spear 
Bruce Wilson 

SECOND 1! ^SS 

Everett Ables 
Hudson Bagett 
Ci m<k Burkhaltei 
Herman Cobb 


t 


Bin Dewitt 
Ralph Edfeldt 
Roscoe Goldsmith 

K III KIT 
I'ai i. k: 

Harold Mai. one 
Joe Rutland 
Seymour Wilkes 


TEACHES APPRECIATION OF WORTHWHILE MUSIC ] 





CLUB... 



A CAPELLA CHOIR 



FIRST TENOR 

Tom Coluns 
Elvis EddlEman 
Eugene Jordan 
Milton Pope 
Vernon Rawlinson 
Joe Riddle 
W'ooukow Wilson 



SECOND TENOR 
curley bowen 
Douglas Davidson 
Charles Mitchell 
Fred Pearson 
Clyde Steak 
Bruce Wilson 



FIRST BASS 
Louis Armstrong 
Robert Cork 
Billy Gwinn 
August Lovegren 
Norman Lovegren 
Carl Whirley 



SECOND BASS 

Everett Ables 
Herman Cobb 
Bill Dewitt 
Ralph Edeeldt 
roscoe coldsmith 
Paii. KlugE 
Joe Rutland 
Seymour Wilkes 



FIRST SOPRANO 
Jacqueline Bagwell 
Sue I '.lax to. \ 
Mary Dickinson 
Frances Dike 
Edna Jo Medlin 
Virginia Mehaffey 



Mary Sue Neely 
Betty Prince 
Myrtice Thomason 

.Margaret Ward 
JanE Claire Wood 
Barbara Woods 



SECOND SOPRAXO 
Jean Buchanan 
Esta Bell Coshatt 
Doris Godwin 
Betty Jane Houlditch 
Sara Jordan" 

Mildred Lovegrex 



ALTO 

Betsy Barnes 
Vivian Houlditch 
Virginia Hill 
Mary Ella James 
Eyra Dell Petria 
Evelyn Scarbroi gh 
1 Ioris Earle Smalley 



vr 








m M 




{/Women 5^ 




Ihtelic^ 

OFFICERS 


y^ts&ociauon 


President 

I 'ice-President 

Secretary 
Treasurer 




MEMBERS 


Gene Grogan 

Kay MarkEE 

Myrtice Thompson 

Doris Godwin 


Barbara Woods 


Betty 


McCool 


Sarah Jordan 


Gene Grogan 


Fuo 


nik Cooper 


Carolyn Gates 


Myrtice Thompson 


Sj 


rah McNeil 


Annette McLeod 


Mildred Vann 




I'okis Godwin 


Mary KaThERINE Finley 



The Amazons of Howard arc represented by the members of the Women's Athletic 
Association. Since 1930, the date of its organization, the W. A. A. lias maintained 
a place of recognition on our campus. This organization has a two-fold purpose. 
Its most important purpose is to promote better sportsmanship, and its secondary 
motive is to create an interest in activity for its own sake. 

In order to obtain only members which will forward these ideals, some require- 
ments for admission are set up. < >ne must have received outside of class period 
a minimum of one hundred points in one sport. A minimum of one hundred 
points must he received every semester in order to retain one's membership. 



PROMOTES SPORTSMANSHIP AMONG THE GIRLS 



136 





asaueri 



*t 



OFFICERS 

President _. __... Rosai.imi Carter 

1'ice-President ._ SEYMOUR WlLKES 

Secretary Frances Goodrich 

Treasurer.. Norma Jeanne Sanders 



Wesley Anderton 
Martha Anderton 
Billy Burns 
Caroll Trotter 
Prances Goodrich 



MEMBERS 

Marjorie Hoi.comb 
Norma Jeanne Sanders 
Rees Wat kins 
Stewart Bell 



Rosalind Carter 
Billy Gwin 
Joe Rutland 
James Wade 
Seymour Wilkes 



Masquers Club is composed of those students on the campus who have shown an 
abiding interest in Dramatics. Members arc admitted first because of Dramatic 
Ability, second, for the spirit of their interest in the art. 

Organized in 1933, Masquers has gained an indispensable place cm the Campus. 
Each year several of the greatest plays of the day are presented as well as some 
written in the Experimental Class. 

Director of activities of the Club is that little Spark of Dynamic personality, 
known affectionately to her fellow Masquers as "Toni". 



PRESENT DRAMATIC ENTERTAINMENT FOR HOWARD 



| L3-3 




2), 



tetU 



ielelic& 



L^iub 



OFFICERS 



1' resident 
I 'ice-President 

Secretary 
Treasurer 



MEMBERS 

M vrthe Kate Anderson 
Marlene Brock 
Martha Patterson 
Glenn a Seerrer 
I )iiki> Jarrett 



Carolyn Thorn roN 

Anita Meadows 

Mary Auston 

Betty Ann Burdk k 



Betty Johnson 
Carolyn Thornton 
Anita MEADOWS 
Mary Austok 
Betty Ann Burdick 



Sue Blanton 
Vivian Norton 
Nell Dexter 
Joyce Saks 
Constance Brown 

The Dietetics Club was founded several years ago to foster interest in dietetics, 
foods, and nutrition. The aid of the organization is not only for the members to 
observe the laws of nutrition, but to help others to observe the laws which are so 
indispensable to the formation of a strong and vigorous race. The aim throughout 
the year has been that every girl should realize the responsibility that she as an 
individual has in so great a task. 

The knowledge of nutrition has developed so rapidly in the last few years that 
the members of the Dietetics Club this term have been busy studying and review- 
ing new hooks and new material. Perhaps a patriotic note could he added to the 
year's program of their work in their direct cooperation with the United States 
Government in protecting its people against deterioration by disease and malnu- 
trition, and establishing a strong and indomitable citizenry. 



STRESSES IMPORTANCE OF THE LAWS OF NUTRITION 



L38 




(JSooklt 



overt 



OFFICERS 

I 'resident Kave MARKEE 

Vice-President - Doris Godwin 

Secretary .......... _ Grace Ezki.i. 

Treasurer ... AUDREY Welch 



Flonnie Cooper 
Mary Virginia Allen 
Doris Walls 
Sarah Sugg 
Grace Kzei.l 
Betty Johnson 



MEMBERS 

Frances Galbreath 
Sarah McNeil 
Audrey Welch 
Reese Watkins 
Mary Walker 
Kaye Markee 



Frances Mil )aniel 
Ruth Allen 

I )ORIS GODW IN 

Sana 11 HOWELL 
S \kaii Jordan 
Jean Mi Daniel 



It was started by a 
and felt the need of 



Booklovers Club was founded at Howard College in 1921 

group of girls who were vitally interested in good reading 

sharing their views with others. The primary purpose therefore is to stimulate this 

interest in current literary works and good literature in general. Booklovers Club 

affords its members active participation in bonk reviewing. 

Only those students who show an intense interest in bunks and attend meetings 

regularly are allowed admission into the club. Meetings are held twice a month, 
when books are reviewed and current writings discussed. Each girl is required to 

review a bonk thus gaining experience in expressing publicly her opinions of liter- 
ary works. This year the Booklovers Club has as its faculty advisor Mi^s Myra 
Dunham of the English Department. 



STIMULATES INTEREST IN GOOD BOOKS 

I 139 I 




bj. {/[/. U. _yv. L^abme 



t 





OFFICERS 




President 




Frances Goodrich 


/ ice-President 




Marge Holcomh 


Secretary 




Florrie Thompson 


Treasurer 


MEMBERS 


Kathryn Abercrombie 


iIaktha Anderton 


Sara Williams 


Katherine Thomas 


Jean McDamki. 


Martha Sue Stokes 


Mary Ella Fames 


Gussie Mae Guyton 


Mary Virginia Allen 


Sana Srccs 


Sarah Howell 


Ann Weaver 


Bernice Brown 


REKS \V ATKINS 


Jink Ray Jones 


Vivian 1 vngley 


Margaret Ward 


Mary K. Finley 


Carolyn Gates 


Edavina Wallace 


Sara Peoples 


Carolyn Garrick 


Margaret Broadwell 


Carolyn Thorto> 


\ Frances Gai i 


Martha PATTERSON 


Doris Walls 


Anne Scannelly 



Through the influence of the "Y. W." a fellowship and understanding is main- 
tained among the girls <>n the campus. It is the purpose of this organization to 
develop the "Fourfold Life" which means mental, physical, social and spiritual 
development. Its greatesl contribution is the development of Christian Character 
and leadership. 

The Executive part of the Y.W.C.A. is carried on by the officer.- elected by 
the Y.W.C.A. at large and the Cabinet, each member of which is chairman of some 
committee. 



DEVELOPS CHRISTIAN CHARACTER AND LEADERSHIP 



I ho ] 





. U. _yv. L^abinet 



OFFICERS 

/'resident . _DAVID Drakk 

/ 'ice-President Louis Armstrong 

Secretary Jimmy COGGINS 

Treasurer ___ _. James SharmAN 



James Sharman 
David Drake 
Jimmy Coggins 
Jones Niager 
Wendell Givens 
Carl Folds 
John Pittman 



MEMBERS 

I ' i b \i.ii Tidwf.ll 
Woodrow Taylor 
Ralph Edfelt 

JlMMIK BEASLEY 

Donald Adcock 
John Crow 



Bill Culbreath 
Marion Allbright 
Eugene Jordan 
Louis Armstrong 
Odeli. Bennett 
KalEb Weehunt 
Vance Vernon 



The Y. M . C. A. is the only organization at 1 Inward College which attempts to 
hold every man on the campus from registration to graduation. The association, 

founded on a truly noble idea, endeavors to build character, spread Christianity and 
promote clean and wholesome fellowship among the men students. 

The Y. M. C. A. is ready at all times to render service to any student on the 
campus, so we would like to think. But however, in the last few years the "V" 
hasn't been active at all. Perhaps it's the fault of the officers or perhaps there 
are too many other organizations on the campus as its officers are quothe to say. 
Anyway, something needs to be done about the Y, M. C. A. 



SUPPOSEDLY PROMOTES CLEAN WHOLESOME FELLOWSHIP 



i n 





I 



inisiena 



u, 



tli 



( H'TICKRS 



President 

I 'ice-President 

Secretary 
Treasurer 



teouauon 



Charles McCain 

Clarence Arnold 

Clark Burkhalter 

I [UBERT Ra-i 



MEMBERS 



Marion T. AbshER 
Eli \V. Adkinson 
Louis Armstrong 
Clarence Arnold 
George E. Bagley 



Jimmie Beasley 
Odell Bennett 
Mason BoNDURANT 
Thomas H. BROCK 

Clarke Burkehalter 
Jerry Walker Bynom 



B. \V. Carter 
Guy I). Casey 
Herman W. Cobb 
James E. Cogcins 
Cecil Franklin Crow 
William W. Crow der 



William Culbreath 
E. C. Day 
John Dodd 
David Drake 
James W. Entw isti.k 
Audrey P. Granade 

James E. Farrington 
Carl GrEnn 
Fred !•'.. i [albrooks 
1 1. Ernest I [allman 

John Lee HlGDON 
James H. Holley 

David S. I Ionian 
E. C. Houston 
Charles H. Hundley 
George I !. Jackson 
Julius V. James 
Kimball Johnson 



Joe Bill Knowles 
Barnard O. LanglEy 
\mos Ledbetter 
Edward Lee 
W. A. Lockler 
Ralph Longshore 

Mabry LuncEford 
Lew is Marler 
Ch vrles McCain 
Donald McRae 
Glenn M. Miller 
James L. Monroe 

Frank Morrison 
Curtis F. Nelms 
Terrell M. Nelson 
Clarence W. Phillips 
Milton Popi 
I low akd Price \xd 



Wilford Provo 
Jacob Hubert Ray 
1 1 \Kni.ii L. Rhodes 
Excell Roberts 
Joe Rutland 
Braxton Sams 
Paul E. Sanderson 

HORTEZ A. Si vlS 

Alister Sinclair 
Thom is Clyde Spear 
I'.h.i^ Stephenson 
George S. Swopi 
W. Gerald Tidwell 
J. Carroll Trotter 
Vance Vernon 
Ernest F. Whei leb 
C \''i. F. Whirley 
John Harvey Wiley 
S. Woodrow Wilson 
Everett V. Wofford 
Robert Wooddy 





UNITES THE MINISTERS IN CLOSER FRIENDSHIP 




1 142 | 


1 

- 






Ji 



owcm 




• • 



iSSiovi ^jrou, 



r 



OFFICERS 

President Clark Burkhalter 

Publicity Chairman Mildred LovEGREn 

Faculty Advisor ._ Dr. L. A. Lovecren 



MEMBERS 



Sarah Scott 
Theresa Franks 
Sana ii SuGG 

Reese Watkins 
Doris EarlE 
Sm u.i.ky 
Clark Burkhalter 



Mildred Lovegren 
Eyra Dell Petrie 
Annie Lee Golden 
Vivian Langley 
Martha IIagood 

\f\KY GlLLILAND 



August Lovegren 
Jeanette Wade 
Katherine Word 
Mildred Bennett 
Mabrv Lunceford 
Marv Walker 



Hubert Ray 
Wilford Provo 
J. W. Crawford 
Joe Knowles 
Joyce Brown 
Annette McLeod 
Woodrow Wilson 



The I Inward Mission Group is a fellowship circle tor all students who are inter- 
ested in Christian work and especially Christian work in the field of missions. 
Then' are no compulsory dues, "Interest in the Cause" being the chief payment to 
the organization. There are no scholastic standards for membership. Dr. Lovegren, 
who is a returned missionary from China, is the chief spark of the organization, 
and he has received splendid help from the president. Clarke Burkhalter. 

The group meets twice each month and hears talks by returned missionaries and 
other spiritual Christian Workers. The Organization has truly been active this 
year. Much good lias been done, and the members have been aided in their Chris- 
tian endeavors. 



INSTRUCTS, AIDS PROBABLE MISSIONARIES 



I 143 | 




L^ki ^Artpka J^>i 



r 



ma 



OFFICERS 



President 

I 'ice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 
Librarian 



J. Vivian Gibbs 
August Lovegren 

F.ii.i.v Smith 

FlonniE CoorER 



MEMBERS 



] IcVT Alverson 
Gene Brow n 
\ \-n Collies 

FLONNIE OiOPER 

Manley Cummins 



Arthur Dowell 
Nellie Friel 
J. Vivian Gibbs 
Kelly Gladden 
Doris Godwin 



Carey Gwin 
George Hagood 
Ri'th Harris 
Bert Holmes 

Oscar I.ee Hcktt 



Davis Ingram 
Evan Lewis 
August Lovegren 
Jack McLEndon 
Robert MizE 
Billy Smith 



Chi Alpha Sigma is ;i National Honorary Chemical Fraternity. The standards for 
membership are very high. Notwithstanding, this very selective organization has a 

large number of members which speaks well of the students in the Chemistry De- 
partment. In fact the fraternity became so large this year that the members de- 
cided that they should have their scholarly faces in the Btltre Nous, and under the 
militant leadership of Vivian Gibbs they were more than willing to heat up the 
poor old editor to satisfy this decision before an agreement was reached. 

The purpose of the organization is to unite the desirable members of the Chem- 
istry Department in fraternalism and the study of various new scientific discov- 
eries. Meeting and discussions arc held twice each month. The Faculty Advisor is 
Dr. Wilcox. 



UNITES DESIRABLE INTELLIGENT CHEMISTRY STUDENTS 

I in I 



! £ r. 

JB Jl 






hBms 

KnttMttJ 


1 I 


^L. .^H 




m 



^ Union L^ouncit 



OFFICERS 



I 'resident 

/ 'ice-President- 

Secretary 
Treasurer 



Ann Weaver 

Mary Ellen Yancy 

Mary Virginia Allen 

1 1 m m v beasley 



MEMBERS 



A nx Weaver 
Mary Virginia Allen 
Mary Ellen Yancy 
Dave Drake 
Betty Barnes 
Vance Vernon 



Vivian LanglEy 
Sara Ceravolo 
Ruth Harris 
C vthryne Word 
Joe Bill Knowles 
Carolyn Garrick 



Marion Albright 
Ralph Johnson 
Sara Sugg 

Ray Atchison 

Gene Jordan 
I )oris Earle Smalley 



John Dodd 
Jimmy BEASLEY 
Carl WhirlEy 
Margis Robinson 

W'lI.EORl) 1'rovo 

Carl Green 



I )r. Vernon G. I >avison 



With such a president as Ann Weaver you would expect any organization to be 
active, very active. The Baptisl Student Union Council has been more than that 
this year. Every morning, morning prayer service was conducted. Everyone was 
urged to come. An Easter Breakfast was provided again this year as was Religious 
Focus Week. 

Its purpose is to serve as a link between college life and religious life. Several 
parties are given each year. This year there was a "Welcoming Party." a Christmas 
Party, and the annual Spring Banquet. The genius behind the success of all the 
B. S. LJ. Parties has been Betsy Panics who was also responsible for making 
friendship circle so enjoyable. 



LINKS THE COLLEGE TO THE CHURCH 



L45 | 





1 _ ' 












R^t ■ JH^HI 





^rnt 



tu 



emauona 



I f\etauon6 L^tub 



OFFICERS 



President 

I 'ice- President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Faculty Advisor 



Run Allen 
J \\n:s Sharman 
George Swope 



MEMBERS 

Doris Godwin 
Billy Riddle 

(".RACE KzEI.L 



Grace Ezeli 

Stewart Bell 

Jean McDaniel 

Jones Xiager 
Dr. Wallace M. Trie 



Stewart Bell 
Jean McDaniel 
Jones Xiager 



The International Relations Club functions under the guidance of the Carnegie 
Foundation for International Peace. The Foundation sends regularly to the Club. 
i'rce of charge, hooks of interest in international affairs. The International Rela- 
tion.-, Clubs of the colleges and universities in the Southern section of the United 
State-, send delegates annually to a Southeastern Convention of the Clubs. 

Members are selected on the basis of scholarship in history courses. A student 
may become a member with a grade of "A" on six semester hours, or with a grade 
of "B" on twelve semester hours of history. Meetings are held regularly, and 
prominent speakers lead discussions on contemporary affairs. 



STUDIES HOME AND FOREIGN RELATIONS 

I 146 I 




^J\appa l^kl ~J\appa 

OFFICERS 

President .... Ray Atchison 

/ 'ice-President Eugene Jordan 

Secretary _._ _. JonKs Xiager 

Treasurer L. C. Muluns, Jr. 



MKMBERS 



Clarke Burkhalteb 
Amos LedbETTER 
Eugene Jordan 



Alox Bee 

I 'a VI, Mc.Cuu.ough 
Jones Xiager 



George Jackson 
Ray Atchison 

I.. C. Mru.iNS. Jr. 



Kappa I 'hi Kappa is a national professional fraternity for men who intend to 
enter the teaching profession. The local chapter. Alpha Iota, was founded in 1928 
under the leadership of the late Dr. Bohannon. Since thai time there have been 
over a hundred and fifty inducted into membership. 

Members are chosen on the basis of character, qualities of leadership and quali- 
ties of scholarship. A minimum number of hours of education is required. 1.. C. 
Mullins and George Jackson represented the chapter this year in Philadelphia at 
the tenth General Assembly. Alpha Iota has received recognition for having one 
of the few .National Alumni Chapters. 



SELECTS PROMISING TEACHERS FOR GUIDANCE 



I 14-3 




^J\appa l^l _yvr/ ^j/ratemit 



t 



OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President 
Secretary-Treasurer 



Jl WITA Mil. AM 

Bobbie Nichols 



Howard Kirkland 
Kloeb I.i i \- 



Bobbie Nichols 



MEMBERS 



Kloeb Lucas 

Howard Kirkland 



The Alpha Alpha Chapter of the Kappa I'i Art Fraternity is comparatively new 
(in our campus. Despite its recent birth mi October 5, 1940, it has gained for itself 
special recognition. Beginning with only seven charter members, its cultural in- 
fluence has been felt throughout the campus. The purpose of Kappa I'i as 

forth in its creed is to provide a means whereby students with artistic ability may 
meet fur informal study and entertainment; to raise the standards of artistic 
work among the students; and to furnish a means of reward to those students 
who have displayed meritorious work. 

Fulfilling this creed, they have gleaned from our college many talented students. 
Besides the student members Alpha Alpha of Kappa I'i has two notable honorary 
members — Miss Alida Townes, the faculty advisor: and Mr. Joe \Y. Clancy. Roth, 
are well known artists. 



RAISES THE STUDENT'S ARTISTIC STANDARDS 

I U8 ] 





. \AJ. C ^^v. ^ymmman L^c 



• • 



ommiteion 



OFFICERS 

President Martha Patterson 

Vice-President - Jean Buchanan 

Secretary - - - Sue Patrick 

Treasurer— _ .. Jane Baker 



MEMBERS 



Nona Kirki.axd 
Gracie Lee Gray 
Sarah Scott 
Marie Standifer 

Martha Patterson- 
Jane Baker 



Mary Pearson 
Mary Helen Sartain 
Mary Gilliland 
Joyce Brown 
Betty Simonton 
Sue Patrick 
Annie Lee Golden 



Rubie Louise Franklin Eunice Ward 
Mattiline Sharbutt Margene Graham 



Dixie Volking 
Jam: Claire Wood 
Jane Donaldson 
Carolyn Epperson 



Marlene Brock 
Laura Mae Whiting 
Doris Shelby 
Rachael Snead 
Pauline Cochrane 



It is the aim of the Freshman Commission, though a separate organization, to 
parallel the work of the regular V. W. C. A. As a tie between the upperclassmen 
and these freshmen girls, they have their sponsor, Ann Weaver, and .she is not in 
the habit of letting grass grow under her feet. Therefore the freshman Y has heen 
a very active and progressive group this year. 

First on the list of plans carried out was the promotion of chapel attendance. 
Yes, and they sold doughnuts, too. They spent your doughnut money in making 
several small, but readily noticeable, improvements on the campus and, of course, 
the year would not have heen complete without the Ereshmen's contribution to na- 
tional defense they did a hit of knitting for the Red Cross. All in all the fresh- 
men spent a busy and successful year. 



DOES EVERYTHING WITH SPARKLING ENERGY 



vjoodb 



v 



e 



FOR A WHILE... 



Alter 12 months of toil, nine working on the book itself and three 
trying' to preserve peace among the students until it came off the 
press, it's all over. And yet, it isn't over — we're merely on the 
threshold of things to come. The 1942 Entre Nous isn't a thing 
that's here today and will be a thing of the past tomorrow. It's 
something permanent, just as is everything that is a part of How- 
ard. \\ e hope you'll not think of it merely as a book, but as a sym- 
bol and a constant reminder of the most cherished of memories. 

For invaluable aid and understanding through the year, we express 
deepest appreciation to Mr. Robert Faeber of the Alabama En- 
graving Company, to Mr. C. S. Missildine of the Birmingham 
Printing Company, and to numerous student contributors. 

The editor now goes with many of his classmates to take his place 
in the fighting forces of the nation, lie wishes for all Howard stu- 
dents the same unlimited enjoyment of Christian fellowship on the 
friendliest campus that he knew. So, goodbye for a while. . . 



PATRONS 




MISS MARY JANE W ATKINS 

Graduated Howard College 

1938 

Graduated Massey Business College 
1941 



For Fifty-Six Years "Massey" Has Trained Young Men and 
Women for Executive Positions. They Can Train You. 

Combined Training Enables Her to Hold Lucrative Position With 
U. S. War Department, Washington, D. C. 

Call 3-7278, 3-7279 



MASSEY BUSINESS COLLEGE 

FOR INFORMATION 



WHEELER BUSINESS COLLEGE 



congratulates the 1942 graduates and undergraduates oi 
Howard College on having the privilege of attending 
this college, whose work is known and most highly 
valued by all alumni and students, the educational 
world, and the public generally. 

Each year a number of graduates and students of 
Birmingham's Colleges enter Wheeler Business College 
to receive training for business and for positions with 
the municipal, state and United States governments. 

Vuii are cordially invited, whether interested in se- 
curing a business education or not. to visit \\ heeler. 
Booklet, "Looking Ahead," will be mailed you on 
request. 



Wheeler ^ 



Klevator Kntrance — 1911 First Avenue 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 
Fifl y-fourth Year 



THE 



BIRMINGHAM 
CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 



Dr. Dorsey Whittingfon 

j-^reiiaent 

Forty-fifth Season 



-A non-profit educational institution 

-Courses leading - to Teacher's Certificate, Bachelor of Music and 
Master of Music Degrees 

-Department of Piano, Voice, Organ, Violin, Cello. Orchestra In- 
struments, Public School Music, Choirmaster's School 

-Pre-school and preparatory departments 

-Only accredited school of music in Birmingham 



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Lunches - Cold Drinks - 


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Compliments of 




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106 N. 18th Street 


Co. 

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ROCKOLAS FOR RENT 

Complete Stock of Columbia. Victor, Decca, 
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Producers of Genuine 

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New — Modern 
Birmingham's Up-to-Date 

SANDWICH SHOPPE 



Compliments of 

Sokol Bros. Furniture Co. 

A Friend of Howard College 

Come By and See Us 

1818 Firs! Ave., N. 



Compliments of 



GREENWOOD CAFE 



Prop., Arthur Greenwood 



407 North 20th Street 



WIMBERLY AND THOMAS 
HARDWARE CO. 

Sporting Goods Department 



Compliments of 
A FRIEND 



_ 



Use 
Alabama's Best 

COKE 

A. B. C. 

COKE 



Phone 4-6533 



Compliments of 

L. G. BALFOUR CO. 

Jewelers and Stationers 
Class Rings: 

Mr. Fitzgerald 108 J/ 2 N. 22nd. St. 



Fraternity Jewelry and 
Invitations 

Mr. Benson, 2104 5th A%'e., N. 




Natural Gas 



SERVICE . . . for home or industry 
CLEAN 

EFFORTLESS 

HEALTHFUL 

ECONOMICAL 
Consult your local Gas Company 

Southern Natural 
Gas Co. 

Birmingham, Ala. 



Compliments 



Brown-Service 



id I LI 



Compliments of 

O. D. ELLARD 

variety store 

School Supplies - Fresh Candies 
8 N. 77th Street 9-9271 



GOLDEN FLAKE 

PRODUCTS 



Always Good — All Ways 



POTATO CHIPS 



SALTED PEANUTS 



PEANUT BUTTER SANDWICHES 



MIXED NUTS, CANDY, ETC. 



MAGIC CITY FOOD PRODUCTS CO 



Wedding Invitations 

and Personal Stationery 

Qenuinely Engraved 



PRINTING & BINDING 

LITHOGRAPHING - ENGRAVING 

OFFICE SUPPLIES OFFICE FURNITURE 

RUBBER STAMPS & SEALS 

PRINTED ADVERTISING & COMMERCIAL ART 



ROBERTS & SON 

"Birmingham's Oldest Business House" 
520-30 S. 19th St. Phone 3-7121 



ZAC SMITH 

STATIONERY COMPANY 

Printing — Engraving 

Drawing Instruments 

Office Furniture 

Visible Records 

Everything Used in an Office 

2014 First Ave., 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Where Howard Students Meet 
LANIER DRUG CO. 

Corner 80th and 2nd. South 
Richard I. Lanier, Prop. 



\* 


atrh 


ea 


Diamond*. Silverware 








Com pli in rnts 










s. 


H. HANOVER 






Es 


tab. 


1909 


YOUR JEWELER 

206 N 


20th 


St. 




Blach's extends good 

wishes to a century 

of progress — 



To the faculty and students and all those 
who have so splendidly guided the destinies 
of HOWARD through this first span of 
decades, Blach's offers congratulations. 
May the hundreds that lie ahead be as 
filled with inspiration and leadership. 



(. . . and to think that 
this firm was born when 
HOWARD was but an 
infant of fourteen years) 



BLACH'S 



FAIR & SQUARE . . . Since 1856 



BIRMINGHAM 

BUSINESS COLLEGE 

LOWEST RATES 
Day and Night Classes 

22\0 l /2 First Avenue, North 

Phone 3-1709 





BAKE WITH 




■" ROLLER 

cHflmpion 


cc 


"The Flour the Best 
Cooks Use" 

Distributed By 

)SBY-HODCES MILLING C 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 


o. 



Southern I Ic.ulquartcrs for 



LABORATORY EQUIPMENT 



AND SUPPLIES 



McKesson & Hohhins, Inc. 



Birmingham, Ala. 



Wood-Fruitticher 
Grocery Co. 



WHOLESALE 
GROCERY 



2321 1st Avenue, North 
Phone 3-3111 Birmingham, Ala. 




4>H 




ALABAMA'S LARGEST STORE 




Schultz-Hodo Realty Co. 



Real Estate - Rentals - Loans 



General Insurance 



Birmingham, Ala. 



Compliments of 



FRIEDMAN JEWELRY CO. 



125 North 19th Street 



Phone 3-S672 



WASN'T IT EXCITING— 

the first time you saw your 

sparkling speaking- Photo- ^ =>w^ ^m 

Reflex pictures? H 

WASN'T IT FUN— I (t *'^7jd 

having 'em taken our '^r %^4 
unique new mirror-camera J ^B 
way ? v 

Our friendly Studio folks are always glad to renew your acquaint- 
ance ... so don't stay away. 

FULL SELECTION OF 8x10 PROOFS PHOTOREFLEX STUDIO 

FOURTH FLOOR 

LOVEMAN'S 





Compliments of 



Hill Grocery Co. 



Birmingham, Ala. 



Atlanta-Southern 
Dental College 

ATLANTA, CEORCIA 

Four-Year Course, Leading to the 
D.D.S. Degree 

Modern Buildings and Equipment 

Ample Clinical Facilities 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS: 
Two Years of College Work 

SESSION OPENS JUNE TENTH, 1942 



For catalog and information write 
Ralph R. Byrnes, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Dean 







Be always at your best. At the 
first sign of fatigue, take a mom- 
ent to relax. Our delicious, 
sparkling beverages will refresh 
you — give you quickly the added 
energy you need. 



Ccca-Cola Bottling Co. 
B'ham Nehi Bottling Co 
Dr. Pepper Bottling Co. 
Double Cola Bottling Co 
Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co. 

Barq's Bottling Co 



Orange Crush-7Up Bot. 
Co. 



Buffalo Rock Co. 

Try-Me Bottling Co. 

New Yorker Beverage 
Co. 



We Cater To 

Parties, Picnics, Teas, 
Weddings 

We Bake and Decorate Our Own 

Cakes and Freeze Our Own 

Ice Cream 

Fred S. Jones & Co., Inc. 

1901 11th Ave., So. 
Phone 3-1233 We Deliver 



JOBE-ROSE JEWELRY CO. 

1917 Second Ave. 

Birmingham, Alabama 

JEWELERS AND SILVERSMITHS 

of Qujlit) 



K^-omplimenli of 

The Staff 



of iL 



ENTRE NOUS 



Patronize Entre Nous Advertisers 



1842 



1942 



HOWARD COLLEGE 
OPENS IN JUNE 



War is setting the pace with which Howard enters its 
second century. The college will not lower any stand- 
ard, will not shorten any course, will not cheapen any 
credit. Yet in this time of national emergency Howard 
offers its students and incoming Freshmen a Program 
so accelerated that any average student can complete 
the full course in three years and a superior student can 
complete the course in two years and one semester. 

It is patriotic to get as much education as you can be- 
fore induction into the nation's services. Speed up by 
saving the waste of long vacations. Come to Summer 
School. Lengthen your stride and cross the finish line 
earlier. 

For details consult the Dean or the Registrar. 



Howard College 

Harwell G. Davis, President 



Birmingham, Alabama 



THE EMBLEM OF 
FINE PRINTING 




^JUSHt*" 



Birmingham Printing Company 

Birmingham, Alabama 







e&dUd. toJ^t 




• * 



act 



COMB WHAT MAY. 



CONFIDENCE is the heritage of youth .... it is also a fundamental 
requirement of business .... attained by long study, training and 



experience 



We have enjoyed the confidence of yearbook Staffs 



throughout the country for over thirty years .... an accomplishment 

for which we are truly grateful and justly proud .... 

* * • • * 

COLLEGE ANNUM, DIVISION 

ALABAMA ENGRAVING COMPANY 

B I R>YI N Q HAM.